Cancer survivor donates hair to help young people

Paula Lamb

Paula Lamb

The hustings at Portsmouth College - from left:  David Carpenter (college governor), Gerald Vernon-Jackson (Lib Dems), Ian McCulloch (Green), Steve Fitzgerald (college teacher and chair), Stephen Morgan (Labour), Kevan Chippindall-Higgin (Ukip) and Penny Mordaunt (Cons)   Picture: Heather Eggelton

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CANCER survivor Paula Lamb was inspired by friends and family to have her long locks cut for charity.

The 46-year-old had it snipped into a bob and her plait will be donated to the Little Princess Trust.

But it wasn’t just wanting a new hairstyle that inspired Paula to make the change.

She had cervical cancer six years ago and, because it was diagnosed early enough, she didn’t have to go through chemotherapy.

But she has watched close friends with cancer lose their hair, as well as her five-year-old nephew Felix Baulch, who has a rare form of eye cancer.

Paula, from Chester Crescent, Lee-on-the-Solent, said: ‘My nephew has had five years of chemotherapy for cancer of the eyes.

‘He has a rare cancer called retinoblastina so I’ve witnessed a young child battle cancer in my own family and chemotherapy’s inevitable side effects.

‘When I was going through my cancer, I was lucky enough to never have chemotherapy.

‘The whole situation is tough enough.

‘I had cervical cancer and it was all removed through surgery. I was so lucky.’

Nine inches of Paula’s hair was cut off and will be sent to the Little Princess Trust, which makes wigs for children with cancer or other illnesses where hair loss is a side-affect.

She heard about the charity through a friend who suggested it when Paula mentioned changing her hair style.

Mum-of-two Paula added: ‘When my friends lost their hair, they had to use wigs made of false hair and you couldn’t style them or colour them.

‘For teenagers and young children it must be difficult.

‘I have two teenagers so I understand how important image and hair is to them.

‘All I wanted to do is give teenagers and children the chance to have a normal life.’

Paula is in her final year of a physiotherapy degree and starting in January will be on placement in the oncology department.

Paula said: ‘With my placement, I will witness lots of other patients and what they have to go through. I will see their battles firsthand.’

A page has been set up for people to make donations to the Little Princess Trust as each wig costs around £300 to make.

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