Centre has grown financially but could still close

HELP NEEDED From left, Debbie Little with daughter Matilda, Vicky Cleaver with son Archie, conductor teacher Mariann Balla, Jordan Guthrie with son Tyler Bloomfield and Donna Magee with son Lennon Beech at the Rainbow Centre in Fareham, which may close at Easter as it has run out of money. Picture: Paul Jacobs (14901-6)
HELP NEEDED From left, Debbie Little with daughter Matilda, Vicky Cleaver with son Archie, conductor teacher Mariann Balla, Jordan Guthrie with son Tyler Bloomfield and Donna Magee with son Lennon Beech at the Rainbow Centre in Fareham, which may close at Easter as it has run out of money. Picture: Paul Jacobs (14901-6)

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THE under-threat Rainbow Centre has improved its finances in the last year but could still face closure unless £150,000 is found.

The Fareham centre, which officers conductive education to disabled children and adults, has released its financial figures from June 2013 to March 2014 and the numbers show income increased by more than £30,289 and expenditure decreased by £21,289.

But despite these promising figures, the centre, in Palmerston Drive, could close after Easter.

It is calling on the community and the users of the service to rally together.

After working out the numbers for the past financial year, Lara Bull, centre director, said the new figures showed how well they were running the centre.

She said: ‘The new figures show that we are £50,000 better off than we were last year.

‘We have managed to spend less and increase our income and yet we still find ourselves in this situation.

‘It shows how well we have done seeing as our adult services have expanded but the quality of the service is still high.’

The centre relies mostly on donations and small grants for income. It is not able to apply for government funding.

Ms Bull said: ‘The centre falls between two stalls in the government. We are considered social and health so we cannot receive funding. Because there is not clear department in which we fall under, they wouldn’t know which one should give us the funding.

‘We aren’t considered a school because our users don’t use us as an alternative to school but we aren’t solely health.

‘So that’s the reason we rely on donations.’

Conductive education helps people with cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s and other conditions improve their motor skills, as well as people recovering from head injuries.

Parents and local businesses have come together to donate.

Fareham MP Mark Hoban has said it would be a tragedy if the centre were to close.

He said: ‘It is really important that the whole community gets behind the centre and gives their support. I have spoken to parents and I have seen children there so I know how the vital the centre is to them. It would be a great tragedy if it closed.’

To donate text RBOW21 £2/£5/£10 to 70070, or call 01329 289500.