Crash families show support for campaign

Jack Farrugia (21) is finally moving into his new house in Drayton. The new house is being paid through compensation from the accident.''Pictured is: (front) Jack Farrugia (21) with (back l-r) Jack's cousin Becky Wareham (23), brother Tom Farrugia (18), mum Lorraine Farrugia and Joe Farrugia (20), in Jack's new bedroom.''Picture: Sarah Standing
Jack Farrugia (21) is finally moving into his new house in Drayton. The new house is being paid through compensation from the accident.''Pictured is: (front) Jack Farrugia (21) with (back l-r) Jack's cousin Becky Wareham (23), brother Tom Farrugia (18), mum Lorraine Farrugia and Joe Farrugia (20), in Jack's new bedroom.''Picture: Sarah Standing
Stuart Burnham with 12-year-old Andrew Impey and his mum, Kirstine Burnham   Picture: Habibur Rahman

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TWO families who suffered the horrendous consequences of car crashes have supported our campaign to get tough on drivers charged with death by dangerous driving.

Jack Farrugia, 22, is disabled for life after being involved in a car crash in Baffins and Lauren Prior, also 22, nearly died after a crash on a roundabout in Emsworth.

In both cases, the drivers received £200 fines and 12-month driving bans for careless driving, a separate offence to death by dangerous driving.

But both families feel the law needs to get tougher on danger drivers and support our campaign calling for the maximum sentence for death by dangerous driving to increase from 14 years.

Lauren suffered horrific injuries five years ago when the car she was a passenger in flipped on to its roof.

‘I don’t think the legal system has got it right,’ said Lauren, from Cowplain.

‘It’s laughable.’

Jack’s mum Lorraine Farrugia spoke candidly about her support for The News’ campaign.

Jack suffered serious brain injuries when the car he was a passenger in struck a kerb and then two parked vehicles.

Lorraine, 50, of Stride Avenue, Baffins, said: ‘People get into a car, wreck other people’s lives and get a low punishment.

‘Unless the law is changed and gets tougher, it is never going to stop. If people got 20 years for this, they might think twice.

‘People get into these huge pieces of metal and think it’s a toy – and it’s a killer.’

The number of cases of death by dangerous driving has gone up from 164 in 2011 to 2012, to 226 in 2012 to 2013.

Only nine per cent of drivers convicted get more than five years.

Justice Minister Chris Grayling has asked the Sentencing Council to investigate a possible review of the 14-year maximum sentence.

The News campaign has been launched following the deaths of local teenagers Payton Sparks, Olivia Lewry, and Jasmine Allsop in two separate car crashes.