Gosport father hopes new year is set to bring justice for his murdered son

112754-647_TERRY_JEANS_SR_5/8/11'Terry Jeans recieves more news from Croatia where the man who was convicted for killing his son Simon Jeans 15 years ago, is is set to have his 11 month suspended sentence increased.''Picture:Steve Reid 112754-647

112754-647_TERRY_JEANS_SR_5/8/11'Terry Jeans recieves more news from Croatia where the man who was convicted for killing his son Simon Jeans 15 years ago, is is set to have his 11 month suspended sentence increased.''Picture:Steve Reid 112754-647

Former University of Portsmouth student Oliver Dearlove

Thug faces years behind bars for killing former University of Portsmouth student with ‘single punch’

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THE father of a soldier killed outside a Croatian nightclub could find out whether his attacker’s sentence will be appealed in the new year.

Terry Jeans, from Gosport, has spent 16 years travelling to Croatia visiting courts after his son, Private Simon Jeans, died in 1996.

In June this year, one of his attackers, Dejan Skaro, was found guilty of hitting the 25-year-old on the head with a rock.

Skaro was given a suspended sentence, which lawyers are expected to appeal.

Mr Jeans has now heard from the Croatian Supreme Court to say a hearing could be scheduled early in the new year.

The 66-year-old hopes this will bring the end of his lengthy battle for justice.

He said: ‘I received a nice email from the court saying they knew Christmas must be a tough time and they would be looking at getting a hearing scheduled in the new year.

‘It’s nice to know I haven’t been forgotten about.

‘I have been writing to them and this shows that my letters haven’t just been put in the bin.’

Pte Jeans died in hospital from a brain haemorrhage following an attack by dozens of thugs when he was enjoying a night out with a group of soldiers.

Earlier this year, his father was awarded around £4,800 in compensation by the Croatian government after the European Court of Human Rights said the length of time it had taken for criminal proceedings was ‘excessive’.

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