Hundreds of drivers caught breaking speed limit in East Hampshire

CRACKDOWN Community Speedwatch members Joan Gilbert, Dave Gorshkov and Bill Hart beside the road in Catherington Lane Horndean between All Saints Church and The Farmer Inn. Picture: Malcolm Wells (122371-466)

CRACKDOWN Community Speedwatch members Joan Gilbert, Dave Gorshkov and Bill Hart beside the road in Catherington Lane Horndean between All Saints Church and The Farmer Inn. Picture: Malcolm Wells (122371-466)

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ALMOST 450 letters have been sent out to drivers warning them they are breaking the speed limit.

It’s exactly one year on from the launch of Community Speedwatch and hundreds of people have been caught out for speeding.

The scheme works with the help of volunteers using speed-monitoring equipment.

They have been trained by police to man a Speed Indicator Device which has a built-in radar that records the speed of oncoming traffic.

The device also flashes up the speed of the vehicle so the driver can see it.

Residents, who work in groups of three, take a note of the registration number of vehicles breaking the limit and pass these details on to police.

Police send offenders an advisory letter.

If they are caught out several times, an officer will visit the person’s address to discuss their speeding.

This week residents were in Catherington Lane. Within an hour of starting up, around a dozen drivers were recorded travelling at over 40mph on a 30mph road.

The team of 17 volunteers rotate around Horndean, Rowlands Castle and Clanfield to survey 20 roads.

Bill Hart, 86, of Drift Road, Clanfield, is one of the volunteers.

He said: ‘Part of why we are doing this is to make people think.

‘We are trying to achieve a safer neighbourhood.

‘It gives people the awareness to keep their speed down.’

The scheme has revealed useful data about speeding hotspots.

These hotspots will be targeted by police, who will be able to issue fines.

The team said they had received questions about why the police were not doing the speed monitoring.

Speedwatch co-ordinator Dave Gorshkov, 51, of New Road, Lovedean, said: ‘If it was left purely to the police, the amount of resources they could employ to this type of exercise would be limited.

‘As local communities, we want to be involved. The irony is that most of the offenders are from our community.’

PSCO Debbie Neesham, from the South of Butser Safer Neighbourhood team, said: ‘Community Speedwatch is one of numerous ways to solve speeding issues and it has proven to be a great success. We have received lots of positive feedback from members of public which is reassuring.’

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