Police survey shows staff lack confidence in Hampshire force

Police morale is said to be low
Police morale is said to be low
A group of up to eight youths destroyed planters in Allaway Avenue, Paulsgrove, on Thursday September 21 at about 7.35pm

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LESS than a fifth of Hampshire police staff have confidence in the direction the force is going as it battles multi-million pound spending cuts, a survey has revealed.

Just 12 per cent of people polled in the first of the force’s staff surveys this year believe operational changes being made will have a ‘positive impact’.

It comes after Chief Constable Andy Marsh revealed plans to axe 535 more officer and staff posts as part of a bid to save an extra £25m by April 2017.

Already 456 officer and 520 staff roles have been cut as the force worked to save £55m in the previous wave of government spending cuts.

The survey also revealed only 21 per cent of staff polled feel valued by the force.

Twelve and 15 per cent of people respectively believe Hampshire police deals with poor behaviour and poor performance in a ‘fair and timely manner’.

In a statement to staff in the force’s latest Frontline internal magazine, Mr Marsh wrote: ‘While I was never under any illusions as to what the feedback we received might tell me about the current mood within the organisation, the data spelled out just how far we need to go to build a constabulary that is equipped not just for the immediate future but for decades to come.’

Elsewhere almost three out of five – 59 per cent – of respondents say they feel motivated to the best of their ability and 70 per cent are happy to ‘go the extra mile’ at work.

At an individual level, 89 per cent of respondents strongly agreed or agreed they are confident that they have the skills to make sound decisions in their role and 80 per cent are clear about what is expected of them.

In total 81 per cent of people polled believe their manager treats them fairly.

But only 36 per cent believe their achievements are appropriately recognised.

Hampshire police has now launched the ‘Bravo’ programme, an online recognition tool, where people can praise their colleagues.

Members of the public who have been impressed by the service provided by officers and staff can also send a Bravo message via the force’s website to share their gratitude. Since the scheme went live in April more than 400 ‘Bravos’ have bene given.

Graham Love, deputy head of human resources, said: ‘The survey will now report into the People Strategy Governance Board and has a clear structure to progress.

‘I know there is some cynicism in the force from previous years that the survey results are not use, also I want to reassure people that once we have the fuller analysis we will be looking at actions we will take based on this.’

The force said the survey was sent to a quarter of the force, and about 47 per cent of people responded.