Speeding motorists in Waterlooville questioned by schoolchildren

Schoolchildren with PC Lynda Potter taking part in Community Speedwatch in Waterlooville
Schoolchildren with PC Lynda Potter taking part in Community Speedwatch in Waterlooville

Terrorism via internet ‘real threat to society’

  • Police work with primary school children to put together surveys to ask speeding motorists
  • Youngsters see police in action using laser guns to check speed outside schools
  • A powerful way to drive home safe driving message
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PRIMARY school children have been helping police drive home the message not to speed on the roads.

Youngsters from across Waterlooville schools were given lessons in road safety and shown how police carry out speed enforcement using a laser gun.

Schoolchildren taking part in Community Speedwatch in Waterlooville with PC Lynda Potter

Schoolchildren taking part in Community Speedwatch in Waterlooville with PC Lynda Potter

They even practised using the laser by measuring their speed running across the playground.

Then they put together a survey with the police to hand out to motorists advising them about their speeding.

On the busy stretches of road outside Queens Inclosure Primary, Woodcroft Primary, Hart Plain Junior, Padnell Junior, Springwood Junior, Morelands Junior, Purbrook Junior, Mill Hill Primary and St Peter’s Primary 
they were shown speed enforcement in action.

Motorists who were caught were given the option of a £100 fixed penalty or participating in the pupils’ survey, which uses questions the children thought up themselves.

In total, 200 people took the survey and 30 people were fined for speeding.

Inspector Dave Humphries, from Waterlooville police, said: ‘Us explaining this to motorists is one thing but when children are saying it to motorists who have been stopped for speeding near their school we believe it will have a more powerful and lasting influence.’

PC James Lipscomb said: ‘Speeding is a community concern at a number of locations and we have been looking at both education and enforcement.

‘This seemed a really positive way to get our education message across.’

John Webster, acting headteacher at Woodcroft Primary School, said the children were very professional and said: ‘It was an excellent way for the pupils to contribute as citizens in the wider community.’