Bomb disposal expert helps train up Nepalese troops

Sergeant Brice Munday assessing the EOD operator from the Neplase Army as he deals with a bomb at the front gate of the barracks.''Picture-Cpl Jamie Peters
Sergeant Brice Munday assessing the EOD operator from the Neplase Army as he deals with a bomb at the front gate of the barracks.''Picture-Cpl Jamie Peters
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An Army Reservist from Gosport who specialises in bomb disposal spent three weeks passing on his skills to the Nepalese Army.

Sergeant Brice Munday, from Elson, serves with 579 Field Squadron (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Royal Engineers and was one of a team of eight providing a niche training package to the Nepalese Army in Kathmandu.

The unit searches out and destroys both conventional munitions – unexploded bombs, grenades, rockets – and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and it was these crucial skills that took the team to Nepal.

The team spent three weeks delivering refresher training to prepare the Nepalese troops for deploying to Mali on the United Nations’ multi-national task, Operation MINUSMA.

After the first week of formal classroom tuition, the team devised scenarios and planted inert/dummy bombs and rockets to test and evaluate how the Nepalese troops dealt with each situation.

Mali, in west Africa, has been torn apart by years of internal fighting so United Nations troops from several countries, including Nepal, are going there to help stabilise the situation.

After years of conflict much of the country will be littered with unexploded bombs, rockets and ammunition.

Sgt Munday, 43, said: ‘I was selected to come out to Nepal based on my previous experience and knowledge of search and explosive ordnance disposal I’ve gained from previous tours.

‘I’ve thoroughly enjoyed being out here, the people are brilliant; the Nepalese are so enthusiastic to learn and I really think our training will make a big difference when they deploy to Mali.’

Sgt Munday, a former pupil at Brune Park School, joined the Army Reserve in 2010 and has served operational tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

Staff Sergeant Nick Connell, the senior instructor, said: ‘This was a real opportunity to share skills and help the Nepalese Army. There is a close-knit cameraderie among the EOD fraternity no matter what nationality.’