Disaster relief practice at Gosport navy base

The science, technology, engineering and maths event at HMS Sultan

The science, technology, engineering and maths event at HMS Sultan

Hundreds of families were elated after the announcement HMS Invincible could arrive in Portsmouth within a week

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  • HMS Sultan held a Stem event to inspire young people to get involved with engineering
  • They were tasked with designing and making a boat to fit with a disaster relief scenario
  • Other activities at the event included flight simulators, making gliders and seeing inside helicopters
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youngsters got a taste of life as an engineer at HMS Sultan.

The base in Gosport took part in a science, technology, engineering and maths event, hosting a challenge to test the skills of the visitors.

The science, technology, engineering and maths event at HMS Sultan

The science, technology, engineering and maths event at HMS Sultan

Faced with a real-life scenario, 25 teams of four had to design and build a boat capable of clearing items from the surface and seabed of a small West Indian island’s harbour following a severe hurricane. Model islands were created and points were given to the teams who cleared the most debris into the safety zones using their hand-made boats.

As well as the competition, the young engineers, from Bay House School, Brune Park Community School, HMS Sultan, HMS Collingwood and students from university technology colleges from around the country, got to take part in other activities. That included flight simulators, making gliders, revving diesel ship engines and seeing inside helicopters.

Benjamin Barry, a Year 12 student from Bay House School in Gomer Lane, said: ‘I enjoyed taking part in the engineering challenge and seeing what other boats people designed.

‘It’s amazing how different all the designs were considering we were given one brief for the same scenario.’

The whole event is about inspiring young people to get involved in engineering and see what it can offer.

Benjamin praised the Stem event saying it was good to get practical experience.

‘We’re doing studies at school for engineering so it’s good to get out and get hands-on experience with some great tools and equipment,’ he said.

The event was important for the Royal Navy to encourage more young people to take up engineering.

Captain Andy Cree, who helped organise the event, said: ‘It’s about inspiring young people to get involved in engineering and see what it can offer.

‘The Stem day allowed them to see engineering from ship engines to gliders.

‘Young people taking part can learn and be inspired while having a lot of fun.’

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