Falklands war dead remembered on new Fareham plaques

REMEMBRANCE The mayor of Fareham Cllr Dennis Steadman unveils one of the new memorial plaques fitted to the Falklands Arch in the Shopping Centre. Picture: Steve Reid (122165-673)
REMEMBRANCE The mayor of Fareham Cllr Dennis Steadman unveils one of the new memorial plaques fitted to the Falklands Arch in the Shopping Centre. Picture: Steve Reid (122165-673)
HMS Duncan has returned to Portsmouth after spending three months in the Mediterranean Picture:  L/Phot Louise George

HMS Duncan returns to Portsmouth after three months away at sea

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The 255 Britons who died during the Falklands Conflict have been remembered with the unveiling of a pair of new plaques.

Every single name is on the plaques, which have been put on Fareham’s Falklands Arch, to mark both the 30th anniversary of the conflict, as well as the start of Armed Forces Week.

Veterans led a short procession through the town centre from the performance podium in West Street, where the Armed Forces Flag was raised, to the arch.

They were joined by a platoon of serving personnel from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force.

Mayor of Fareham, Councillor Dennis Steadman, unveiled the plaques and said: ‘I’m very proud to have led the civic party at the Armed Forces flag-raising event for Fareham, in recognition of the outstanding contribution made by all of our armed forces, past, present and future.

‘I’m particularly honoured to have unveiled these new plaques.’

Ann Townsend, of Mainsail Drive in Fareham, lost her son Neil Grose, when he was killed on his 18th birthday in the battle for Mount Longdon.

She said: ‘It has been busy with this being the 30th anniversary, but this is great. It’s important to have their names there – I’m always proud of him.’

Armed Forces Day on Saturday will be marked with a series of free events from 12.30pm to 4.30pm at the Historic Dockyard in Portsmouth.

The centrepiece will see the Victory arena transformed into a 1940s-style street party.

Professor Dominic Tweddle, director-general of the National Museum of the Royal Navy, said: ‘It’s an opportunity to connect people to the modern navy.

‘It’s important for us. The navy is not just in the past, the navy is doing important things now and Armed Forces Day allows people to see what our Armed Forces are doing for them.’