Hundreds turn out to remember 122 lives lost in the war

RESPECT Veterans turned out to Ann's Hill cemetery in Gosport. Pictures: Malcolm Wells (122131-3233)
RESPECT Veterans turned out to Ann's Hill cemetery in Gosport. Pictures: Malcolm Wells (122131-3233)

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AS wreaths and crosses were laid, the names of 122 people who were killed in Gosport during the Second World War were read out at a moving memorial service.

The annual ceremony was held at Ann’s Hill Cemetery to remember the service personnel and civilian residents killed.

POPPIES The Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire Mary Fagan lays the first of the wreaths at the war memorial. (122131-3394)

POPPIES The Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire Mary Fagan lays the first of the wreaths at the war memorial. (122131-3394)

A civic procession, led by the Horndean Band, left the west gate of the cemetery for the memorial.

Mayor of Gosport, Councillor Richard Dickson, and the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire Dame Mary Fagan, the Queen’s representative in the county, joined the procession.

Councillor Peter Edgar said the ceremony proved very popular.

‘It was emotional for me being a young child in the war,’ he said.

‘There was a very good crowd there of all ages.

‘It brought memories flooding back to me and made me think how lucky I was to survive. I was within 30 yards of three major bomb blasts.

‘The service was for all the humans that died through the horrors of war.

‘The public have expressed a need to have a remembrance of the people who have been killed. It’s for everybody who has memories of people that had been in the town at that time.

‘The town was very much in the front line at the time.

‘Gosport was a German target. Sometimes this is forgotten, but this reminds people about that.’

The ceremony was conducted by the Mayor’s Chaplain, the Rev Andy Davis.

Dame Mary and the mayor were among those to lay a wreath.

And while members of the Uniformed Youth Service Organisations laid crosses, members of the Royal British Legion read aloud the names of those who lost their lives more than 67 years ago.

Plans for a flypast by a Second World War Spitfire were cancelled due to poor weather.