Jobs facing the axe at Portsmouth Royal Navy museum

The National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth needs to make savings
The National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth needs to make savings
Shell - James Martin with the piece of shell which hit HMS Baham during the first world war. In the background is a photograph of the ship

THIS WEEK IN 1984: Veteran finds shell that struck his ship in Southsea junk shop

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JOBS could be axed at Portsmouth’s top naval museum as it deals with a fall in grants.

The National Museum of the Royal Navy, based at the Historic Dockyard, is looking to reduce its workforce to deal with budget pressures.

The National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth

The National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth

Professor Dominic Tweddle, director general of the NMRN, said any job losses would fall across all levels of the organisation, and The News understands some senior members of staff have already put themselves forward.

Prof Tweddle said: ‘What has happened is that, in common with other national museums, our grant has been drifting downwards.

‘We have to restructure the organisation based on the fact we have less money coming through the door.

‘The trustees have concluded we should reduce the head count by about 10 per cent as a result.

Director general of the museum Dominic Tweddle

Director general of the museum Dominic Tweddle

‘Life is tough at the moment, and it’s not something we’re thrilled to be doing.

‘But this is the right starting place as clearly we do not want to be making any compulsory redundancies.

‘We think it’s right that if we are making cuts they should fall throughout the organisation.

‘About 30 per cent of our income comes from the Ministry of Defence and that is the bit that comes under pressure.

‘We don’t have a choice, it’s either this or we spend beyond our means.’

The museum has had considerable success in recent years with grants for projects including the restoration of various historic vessels.

But this cash, which runs into millions of pounds, is conditional on it being spent upon the vessels and cannot be used for 
wages.

One NMRN worker, who did not wish to be named, told The News: ‘We are all very shocked and worried about the future.

‘We had a round of redundancies four years ago and now we are back in the same position.’