People left upset after spelling blunder on Southsea plaque

BOURNE IDENTITY The plaque with the spelling mistake
BOURNE IDENTITY The plaque with the spelling mistake
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A SPELLING error on a memorial plaque honouring a brave group of Royal Marines has caused outrage among residents and veterans.

The Cockleshell Heroes were a group of 10 Royal Marines who risked their lives by taking part in a daring raid on German warships in Bordeaux during the Second World War.

As reported in The News, a new plaque was unveiled in Eastney last month to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the raid.

But the plaque says the Cockleshell Heroes embarked on a ‘canoe-bourne’ attack, when it should be spelled ‘canoe-borne.’

It also describes the daring raid as having taken place in WW11, instead of WWII.

Stuart Attrill, of Midlington Road in Droxford, served in the Royal Air Force.

The 69-year-old said: ‘I thought it was absolutely disgusting when I saw it.

‘The person who put the words together should have spotted it and the person who made the plaque could have said something as well.

‘It’s something that means a lot to a lot of people.

‘Something definitely needs to be done about it.’

The Cockleshell Heroes left their submarine HMS Tuna off the coast of France and headed to Bordeaux Harbour in pursuit of enemy warships in canoes. When the men arrived, they sank one Nazi ship and severely damaged four others using mines.

Two of the men drowned after attempting to escape afterwards and six others were captured by the Germans and executed.

Two others made it back to the UK unharmed.

Portsmouth City Council said the plaque’s wording was written and approved by the Royal Marines Association.

A spokesman from the association was unavailable for comment yesterday.

The plaque was unveiled on December 9 on the corner of Henderson Road and Cockleshell Gardens, as requested by neighbours in the area.

The Cockleshell Heroes were also recently honoured with two other blue plaques in Southsea, where many of them lived.