Royal Navy ship will guard removal of chemical stockpile from Syria

United Nations diplomat Sigrid Kaag inspecting preparations at the Port of Latakia for the elimination of Syrian chemical weapons. Picture: UN

United Nations diplomat Sigrid Kaag inspecting preparations at the Port of Latakia for the elimination of Syrian chemical weapons. Picture: UN

March 1962 and a naval rating signals Halt to more conventional traffic as the Saunders-Roe SRN1 crosses the seafront at Lee-on-the-Solent and returns to HMS Ariel, now the site of the Hovercraft Museum. Roles such as anti-submarine warfare, air-sea rescue and mine countermeasures were foreseen.						                                Pictures courtesy Amberley Publishing

Spotlight hovers over Lee-on-the-Solent museum

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Britain is to send a Royal Navy ship to Syria to safeguard vessels removing the country’s chemical stockpile.

The British government has announced it will destroy 150 tonnes of industrial-grade chemicals as part of the international effort to dismantle President Bashar al-Assad’s illegal weapons stockpile.

The Foreign Office said the chemicals will be shipped to a British port with suitable equipment before being transferred to a commercial site where they will be incinerated.

It is part of the international effort to dispose of Syria’s chemical stockpile, following the agreement by Assad to give up his weapons in a deal brokered by the United States and Russia.

A Royal Navy warship will be sent to help protect the Danish and Norwegian cargo vessels, which will ship the entire stockpile out of Syria, as they are sailing through international waters.

A spokeswoman for the Ministry of Defence told The News the vessel would be a frigate or destroyer, but no decision has yet been made as to which ship will be sent.

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