Sailors brave desert heat for Race for Life at sea

ON BOARD Sailors on HMS Kent completed the Race for Life.
ON BOARD Sailors on HMS Kent completed the Race for Life.
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PINK tutus and trainers are not usually part of naval dress code.

But when the female sailors of HMS Kent decided to run the Race for Life on board their ship, the usually grey decks were awash with colour.

Kitted out in pink, the sailors raced around the Portsmouth-based Type 23 frigate’s upper deck 22 times to complete the 5km race.

As well as trying to negotiate the narrow parts of the deck, the sailors had to endure temperatures of up to 35C.

In total, the ship’s company managed to raise £1,000 for the fight against cancer.

Able Rating Nat McGrogan organised the event.

She said: ‘This charity in particular means a lot to us all, in some way or another.

‘It was our pleasure to raise this money. We hope it will make a difference in the future and demonstrates that no matter where you are in the world you can raise money for people that 
matter.’

HMS Kent is deployed in and around the Gulf.

She is working as part of the Combined Maritime Forces, as part of a mission to bring security and stability to the maritime traffic there.

Helen Johnstone is a spokeswoman for Cancer Research UK, which organises the Race for Life events.

She said: ‘It’s fantastic the girls from HMS Kent have taken time out to raise money for our life-saving research work by organising their own Race for Life event, especially in such an unusual venue and in such terrific heat.

‘It sums up the kind of feisty spirit that many of the women who take part in Race for Life have.

‘We’re grateful for all their efforts and can assure them that it really will help us beat cancer sooner.’

The HMS Kent run was organised through a Race for Life initiative called Race At Your Place.

It allows people to organise their own Race for Life events on a smaller scale than the bigger regional races, including the one in Portsmouth.

Helen added: ‘Nat is absolutely right – wherever you are, with a bit of ingenuity, you can still do your bit to help people who matter to you.’

Race for Life is the flagship event of Cancer Research UK.

There are more than 230 events which regularly take place across the country.