Trees will become ‘living memorials’ in centenary plan

Soldiers during teh Gallipoli campaign in the First World War. Below, Martin Heighway and his grandfather Richard Beresford Heighway
Soldiers during teh Gallipoli campaign in the First World War. Below, Martin Heighway and his grandfather Richard Beresford Heighway
British military dog Mali who has received the PDSA Dickin Medal, the animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross with his current handler Corporal Daniel Hatley

NATIONAL: Mali the dog gets top military honour

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SAILOR Martin Heighway aims to plant 100 trees as living memorials to those who died in the defining campaign of the First World War.

Lieutenant Heighway, based at HMS Sultan in Gosport, wants to honour dead from the 1915 Dardanelles campaign.

A Gosport-based Royal Naval Reserves Officer has just revealed his project to plant 100 pine trees across Hampshire and the IOW to become 'Living Memorials' to those who fought and died in the Dardanelles.''Martin Heighway, who lectures in Defence and Political Studies at HMS Sultan in Gosport and is a Training Officer at HMS King Alfred in Portsmouth came up with the idea after researching the conflict for a forthcoming battlefield tour to Gallipoli in late August.''During the First World War, the defining campaign of 1915 centred on a narrow finger of land in Turkey known as the Gallipoli peninsula. One hundred years later this year the nation will remember those who fought and died in Gallipoli, with commemorative events in London and in Hampshire.''Martin's grandfather, Richard Beresford Heighway served as a reservist private in the Herefordshire Regiment and was amongst the troops who landed at Suvla Bay in August 1915, just north of where the initial landings at Cape Helles and ANZAC Cove (including th

A Gosport-based Royal Naval Reserves Officer has just revealed his project to plant 100 pine trees across Hampshire and the IOW to become 'Living Memorials' to those who fought and died in the Dardanelles.''Martin Heighway, who lectures in Defence and Political Studies at HMS Sultan in Gosport and is a Training Officer at HMS King Alfred in Portsmouth came up with the idea after researching the conflict for a forthcoming battlefield tour to Gallipoli in late August.''During the First World War, the defining campaign of 1915 centred on a narrow finger of land in Turkey known as the Gallipoli peninsula. One hundred years later this year the nation will remember those who fought and died in Gallipoli, with commemorative events in London and in Hampshire.''Martin's grandfather, Richard Beresford Heighway served as a reservist private in the Herefordshire Regiment and was amongst the troops who landed at Suvla Bay in August 1915, just north of where the initial landings at Cape Helles and ANZAC Cove (including th

The pines will be planted across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight with the first planted in Gosport.

Lt Heighway, whose grandfather fought in the Gallipoli campaign, said: ‘Every day I teach young Royal Navy personnel about their proud history, including how some sailors became the infantry of the Royal Naval Division and were involved in some of the bloodiest land battles of The First World War.

‘I found the idea of extending the Lone Pine metaphor to the modern day enchanting. Young men from the RND sacrificed a great deal.’

More than 500,000 people died in the Gallipoli campaign, fought between April 25 in 1915 and January 9 in 1916.

A Gosport-based Royal Naval Reserves Officer has just revealed his project to plant 100 pine trees across Hampshire and the IOW to become 'Living Memorials' to those who fought and died in the Dardanelles.''Martin Heighway, who lectures in Defence and Political Studies at HMS Sultan in Gosport and is a Training Officer at HMS King Alfred in Portsmouth came up with the idea after researching the conflict for a forthcoming battlefield tour to Gallipoli in late August.''During the First World War, the defining campaign of 1915 centred on a narrow finger of land in Turkey known as the Gallipoli peninsula. One hundred years later this year the nation will remember those who fought and died in Gallipoli, with commemorative events in London and in Hampshire.''Martin's grandfather, Richard Beresford Heighway served as a reservist private in the Herefordshire Regiment and was amongst the troops who landed at Suvla Bay in August 1915, just north of where the initial landings at Cape Helles and ANZAC Cove (including the

A Gosport-based Royal Naval Reserves Officer has just revealed his project to plant 100 pine trees across Hampshire and the IOW to become 'Living Memorials' to those who fought and died in the Dardanelles.''Martin Heighway, who lectures in Defence and Political Studies at HMS Sultan in Gosport and is a Training Officer at HMS King Alfred in Portsmouth came up with the idea after researching the conflict for a forthcoming battlefield tour to Gallipoli in late August.''During the First World War, the defining campaign of 1915 centred on a narrow finger of land in Turkey known as the Gallipoli peninsula. One hundred years later this year the nation will remember those who fought and died in Gallipoli, with commemorative events in London and in Hampshire.''Martin's grandfather, Richard Beresford Heighway served as a reservist private in the Herefordshire Regiment and was amongst the troops who landed at Suvla Bay in August 1915, just north of where the initial landings at Cape Helles and ANZAC Cove (including the

Lt Heighway’s grandfather, Richard Beresford Heighway, was a reservist private and landed at Suvla Bay in August 1915, north of the initial landings at Cape Helles and Anzac Cove.

The Suvla landings were supposed to be a breakthrough but little progress was made.

In an effort to draw away Turkish troops the Anzacs carried out diversions, including on Turkish trenches at a place known as Lonesome or Lone Pine.

Artillery fire there reduced a wooded area to one tree. There were 2,200 Anzac casualties over four days of bitter fighting.

Cpl Benjamin Smith sent a souvenir pine cone from a Turkish trench cover home to his mother after the capture of Lone Pine Ridge.

She kept the cone for 13 years and two plants grew from it.

One was planted at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra in 1934.

Lt Heighway added: ‘As a tree grows, so may the memory of that sacrifice grow and eventually self perpetuate.

‘Those in Hampshire who receive a Memorial Pine will be able to maintain a reminder of the Gallipoli campaign, and the part Hampshire played in it.’

The first tree in the project will be planted at Bay House School on Tuesday.