A million words later, new reading scheme is a hit

BOOKWORMS Megan Baker, 12, and Skye Marshall, 13, with some of the books they have read at Brune Park Community School in Gosport. Picture: Sarah Standing (1352-947)
BOOKWORMS Megan Baker, 12, and Skye Marshall, 13, with some of the books they have read at Brune Park Community School in Gosport. Picture: Sarah Standing (1352-947)
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STUDENTS at a Gosport school have hit the million-word milestone thanks to a new literacy scheme.

Pupils at Brune Park Community School have been taking part in the Accelerated Reader Scheme.

It has seen pupils in Years 7 and 8 read books and take part in a quiz afterwards to test them on their knowledge of the book.

The number of words in each book is then calculated and each student is presented with a certificate when they reach a landmark.

It links to The News’ Read All About It campaign to boost literacy in schools.

Year 8 pupil Megan Baker, 12, was the first to reach a million words.

She has now read over three million words in total.

She said: ‘I love reading. Doing the questions is a good way to test your knowledge about how well you read the book.

‘It gives you stuff to do and it fires your imagination.’

And Megan said she was thrilled to be the first to reach the milestone.

‘It feels really good. I hope I can read more books to get higher. I think my next goal will be five million words.’

Skye Marshall, 13, also in Year 8, was the second pupil to reach the target.

She said: ‘Megan and I ended up doing it together and trying to compete against each other.

‘I really like reading. Before I came to Brune Park I read a lot.’

Mikaela Milne, advanced skills teacher for literacy, said: ‘We wanted to promote Brune Park as a school that reads and it’s become part of our culture.

‘We did this and it took off. They absolutely love it.

‘They are talking about reading, which didn’t happen before. It’s become a culture of reading and that’s become the norm.’

And Miss Milne stressed the importance of reading.

‘They can’t access any subject without good literacy skills,’ she said.

‘They are transferable in every single subject. And it’s not just in school – if you can’t read the basics you will struggle with every single thing you do in life.’