Bricklaying, baking and hairdressing make for a great careers fair

NEAT From left, Lisa Shelley, beautician at Chichester College, with Warblington School pupils, Lisa Tambling, Demi Meir and Elly Thompson.  Pictures: Allan Hutchings (120559-666)
NEAT From left, Lisa Shelley, beautician at Chichester College, with Warblington School pupils, Lisa Tambling, Demi Meir and Elly Thompson. Pictures: Allan Hutchings (120559-666)
Dogs use facial expressions to communicate

Dogs use facial expressions to communicate

0
Have your say

WHETHER they had ideas of joining the forces, becoming a hairdresser or learning to be a computer whizz, there was plenty on offer for students at a careers fair.

Pupils from eight Havant schools, from Years 9, 10 and 11, descended on Havant College yesterday for one of the biggest careers events of the year.

CLOSE Fareham College head of motor vehicle studies Paul Brimecome shows an engine to Prospect School pupils, Dan Busby and, right, Adam Crawshaw.  (120559-713)

CLOSE Fareham College head of motor vehicle studies Paul Brimecome shows an engine to Prospect School pupils, Dan Busby and, right, Adam Crawshaw. (120559-713)

It gave the youngsters an opportunity to try their hand at dozens of different skills at a crucial stage in their school lives.

As well as having a go at health and beauty, pupils were able to roll their sleeves up and get dirty.

Ian Bird, from Fareham College, showed interested youngsters how to take apart a motorbike engine.

He said: ‘Most of the boys and girls have no idea how an engine works but have a vague feeling that they might be interested in mechanics as a career.

‘We let them have a go and try to cultivate that feeling.’

The typical stereotype of a male builder went out the window when a queue of girls formed to have a go at bricklaying.

Lecturer Derek Rogers, from Gosport College, said: ‘There’s been a lot more girls than boys.

‘The girls have no worries about getting stuck in and getting a bit dirty.

‘Some of them were really good at it and you can see they have a natural skill.

‘It’s the boys who don’t want to get messy.’

Colleges were on hand to show what courses they offer, while businesses such as Xyratex, and apprenticeship providers such as PETA, also attended.

Emily Anderson, 14, from Purbrook Park, said: ‘The teachers have told us that what we do now will make a difference to our future and how important our choices now are.

‘Before I came here today I had been thinking about being a magazine photographer and I was able to talk to the colleges to find out more about it. Now I know that’s definitely what I want to do so it’s been really helpful.’

Year 9 pupil Nicole MacKenzie, from Purbrook Park School made the most of the opportunities.

She said: ‘I’ve had my hands massaged, made a cake and now I’m having a go at doing hair.

‘It’s been a good day because it’s helped me decide I want to go into hair and beauty.’