Child genius? No that’s not me, I’m simply clever

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THERE’S one thing that Leo Buckley can’t stand, and that’s being labelled.

So a programme entitled Child Genius is something that Leo finds provocative.

Leo Buckley (11) from Kingscourt School in Catherington, will be appearing on Channel 4's Child Genius.''''Picture: Sarah Standing (131671-8273)

Leo Buckley (11) from Kingscourt School in Catherington, will be appearing on Channel 4's Child Genius.''''Picture: Sarah Standing (131671-8273)

The 11-year-old, who goes to Kingscourt School in Catherington, was selected out of nearly 2,000 children to get down to the final 21.

The series explores what makes certain children bright and how parents can help their kids learn. Also how they cope with parenting intelligent children.

‘Why I did it was to meet other interesting people, which I did,’ said Leo.

When asked if he considered himself to be a genius, Leo said: ‘I don’t think that word is correct.’

Children in the series competed in a competition set up by Mensa. They went through a series of tests including maths, memory, logic, history and spelling.

Leo said he found the process challenging but fun.

Although there were a few bits that he felt could have been portrayed better, he definitely does not believe in the title.

Leo’s mum Penny said: ‘We have talked a lot about the term “child genius” and about what intelligence is, and that it is not fixed.’

Penny said that she thought Leo had got to know himself better although they have found having the cameras around quite intrusive.

Leo took part in two weekends of tests and the cameras were in the family home in Alton for several days.

Leo said: ‘Television is much harder to make than watch.’

Dad Martin, a university lecturer at Southampton Solent University, said: ‘I was nervous about letting the cameras in and worried about it being another dodgy reality TV show. But the producers convinced me they were trying to say something real about kids’ intelligence.

‘With Ofsted announcing that the top 20 per cent of intelligent kids are let down by state schools, the debate couldn’t be more relevant.’

The four-part documentary started last week and continues tomorrow at 9pm.