Children are busy preparing grounds for two open days

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GARDENING is as much a part of Wicor Primary’s curriculum as sport, and it’s something that the children love.

The pupils have spent hours working in the school grounds ahead of the school’s two upcoming open days.

)''Wicor Primary School are hosting a National Open Gardens day on Sunday 23rd June and Sunday 7th July with all proceeds going to charity.''Pictured is: (back l-r) Lewis Curtis (11) and Lucia McEvoy (10) with (front l-r) Adam Fox (8) and Brooke Gordon (8) in their allotment at the school.''Picture: Sarah Standing (131702-8829)

)''Wicor Primary School are hosting a National Open Gardens day on Sunday 23rd June and Sunday 7th July with all proceeds going to charity.''Pictured is: (back l-r) Lewis Curtis (11) and Lucia McEvoy (10) with (front l-r) Adam Fox (8) and Brooke Gordon (8) in their allotment at the school.''Picture: Sarah Standing (131702-8829)

The Portchester primary school will be proudly showing visitors its tropical flowerbed, pond, allotments, orchard and woodland.

The days are part of the National Garden Scheme, which sees 3,700 gardens open their gates to raise money for charity.

Along with helpers from the community, and volunteers from Scottish Southern Energy, the school grounds are flourishing with all kinds of vegetation.

Volunteer Joe Bowen said; ‘There’s a lot of hard work gone into it.

‘The children have helped to create the garden, that’s the main thing. They are the new generation of gardeners. The more we get them interested now, the better.’

Amanda Fuller, admin assistant at the school, said: ‘We are getting ready for our first opening for the National Garden Scheme, as far as I’m aware we are the first school to be in the scheme.’

SSE workers have given up their time to build a Darwin thinking path, inspired by Charles Darwin.

The path snakes around the grounds and means that disabled visitors will also be able to reach all parts of the school’s land.

Amanda said: ‘The kids love it, they really do. It means we can offer them much more in the learning environment, from the planting to the nurturing, to the science, the maths and the calculation, to eating the produce. It gives them an opportunity to do something which they wouldn’t do at home.’

Year 6 pupil Lewis Curtis, 11, said: ‘There’s lots of things I like, too much to say. There’s so much to do all the time, there’s so much planting. It’s full of environmental things to do.’

Year 3 pupil Brooke Gordon, eight, said: ‘I like it as there are nice colourful things and after they are grown, we can eat them.’

The school also has a camera obscura which will be open if the weather is fine.

Year 6 teacher Alison Nash said: ‘That’s quite a feature for people to come and see. It’s one of only 13 in the country.’

The open days take place this Sunday and Sunday, July 7 from 10.30am until 4pm. Entry is £3.50, and free for children.