Children look back at history of Old Portsmouth school

Headteacher Joy Waelend with (l-r) youngest pupil Kenzie Scott (4), and oldest pupils, twins Rio Le Ray (11), and Hudson Le Ray (11)
Headteacher Joy Waelend with (l-r) youngest pupil Kenzie Scott (4), and oldest pupils, twins Rio Le Ray (11), and Hudson Le Ray (11)
The Battle of Jutland, pictured, will be the subject of the U3As autumn lecture

Jutland is one of the autumn highlights of U3A

  • St Jude’s Church of England Primary School moved to its current site in October 1965
  • Children have been writing their memories of their school
  • They studied events that happened in 1965
0
Have your say

CHILDREN have celebrated their school reaching half a century at the heart of the community.

St Jude’s Church of England Primary School in Old Portsmouth moved to its current site from Marmion Road in October, 1965.

It’s important for them to understand culturally how life has changed in the last 50 years and how they can positively contribute to what life will be like in the next 50 years

Joy Waelend, headteacher

To celebrate the anniversary, the children looked at all the different events that have happened over the past 50 years and created big gold paperchains with memories of the school written on the inside.

Children across the school looked at what was happening in 1965, including Tom and Jerry, The Beatles, Martin Luther King and Winston Churchill.

Children in Year 4 focused on Mary Poppins, which was released that year.

They were tasked with re-writing the advert for a nanny which was sung in the film, as well as drawing pictures from the cartoon scene.

Saffron Peattie, nine, is in Year 4. She said: ‘It’s good that the school has been around for so long.

‘It doesn’t look that old. I have enjoyed school this week. The Mary Poppins part was fun.’

Louis Bingham, eight, added: ‘It feels weird because the school doesn’t look that old.

‘I have enjoyed school this week because we got to watch Mary Poppins.’

Headteacher Joy Waelend said: ‘It’s important for the children to realise and to understand that this school has been around for a long time and it’s had its foundation in Portsmouth for a long time – it is part of their history.

‘It’s important for them to understand culturally how life has changed in the past 50 years and how they can positively contribute to what life will be like in the next 50 years.

‘Thirty years ago we were using chalk boards instead of iPads and computers.

‘The children just need to understand that life continues beyond today.

‘I think they have loved it. The children really enjoy doing something different.’

The children’s assembly was replaced by a school quiz, testing them on everything that they had learnt about their school over the past 50 years.

Parents were invited into the school for a celebratory tea party to look at the work that the children had done.