Children step into parents’ shoes 
at BAE open day

Julian Brown (60) with his family (l-r) son-in-law Paul Saunders (29), daughter Sara Saunders (28), wife Karen Brown (60) and daughter Kate Brown (31).

Picture: Sarah Standing (170958-5461) PPP-170721-151239001

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IT’S not often that children get to have a sneak peak at what their parents get up to at work.

But yesterday, employees at BAE Systems did just that by inviting their children and grandchildren to come and get a taste of working life.

Production engineer Tony Tweddle  with his grandson Cameron Burton  check the tolerances on a flexible coupling for the tail section of a Spearfish Torpedo ''''Picture: Malcolm Wells (141208-0273) PPP-140424-193155001

Production engineer Tony Tweddle with his grandson Cameron Burton check the tolerances on a flexible coupling for the tail section of a Spearfish Torpedo ''''Picture: Malcolm Wells (141208-0273) PPP-140424-193155001

Around 30 workers at both the Broad Oak site in Hilsea and the dockyard took part in a parents and children day.

Tony Tweddle, a production engineer, took his 13-year-old grandson Cameron Burton into work.

The 62-year-old said: ‘It’s all about getting young people into the environment of an industry.

‘The idea is to let them come in, see what it’s like inside a factory and understand how people do things and what we produce.

‘Hopefully it will encourage them to look at working in this type of industry in the future.

‘I was a bit nervous but I’m happy that I had the opportunity for him to come in.’

Cameron added: ‘It’s quite nice for me to know what my grandad does here.’

Viv Hine, 53, the education and early careers manager, took her 14-year-old son Roy.

She said: ‘It’s been interesting because he’s been able to do something useful.

‘He’s been reviewing our BAE education website to see how appealing it will be for young people.

‘It’s been quite odd having him in. It’s strange for both of us seeing ourselves in a different context.

‘It’s useful for him to have a look at the real world of work.’

Rory added: ‘It’s a bit strange. I didn’t think it was going to be this big and technical and complicated.’