Defender helps children learn about respect

Pompey player Mustapha Dumbaya talks to children at Solent Junior School in Drayton as part of the campaign to kick racism out of football.  Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (123233-1)

Pompey player Mustapha Dumbaya talks to children at Solent Junior School in Drayton as part of the campaign to kick racism out of football. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (123233-1)

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CHILDREN had a special visit from a Pompey player as part of a workshop to promote an anti-racism campaign.

Youngsters at Solent Junior School in Drayton were visited by Pompey in the Community yesterday with defender Mustapha Dumbuya.

The children were learning about different cultures and countries around the world.

They were tasked with matching up some Pompey players with the country they came from.

It was all part of the One Game, One Community campaign which aims to kick racism out of football.

Mustapha worked with the children, helping them to identify the countries and even taking part in a quiz.

He said: ‘I’m always up for coming into schools and getting out in the community. It’s really good.

‘I like getting involved in stuff like this. It’s fun.

‘It’s about respect. You treat people how you want to be treated.

‘It’s not all about the pitch.

‘You are a role model for these kids at the end of the day.’

Adam Lea, education manager for Pompey in the Community, said: ‘It’s about raising awareness amongst youngsters about different cultures around the world and what sort of backgrounds people come from.

‘The kids have responded well to it.

‘Portsmouth Football Club is a massive community club. The children really relate well to us coming in and working with them.’

George Burgess, 10, said: ‘It’s fun and you learn not just about football, it’s about other countries. That’s good.’

Sarah Haydon, deputy headteacher, said: ‘I think this is fantastic. The children are really enthusiastic about it. It’s such an important issue.

‘Our children are very respectful, we are lucky. This makes them think.’

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