Fareham’s schools are in top 10 for grades

WELL DONE Pupils Sammi Stoyles, Hannah Raymond, Natalie Fall, and Sherri Barnhard celebrating their results last year at Neville Lovett.  (113043-6)
WELL DONE Pupils Sammi Stoyles, Hannah Raymond, Natalie Fall, and Sherri Barnhard celebrating their results last year at Neville Lovett. (113043-6)
Charlie Dickie at the Havant Sixth Form campus of HSDC Picture: Habibur Rahman (171065-43)

Visions for the future are cemented as great results see Havant and Waterlooville students off to follow their dreams

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FOUR Fareham secondaries are in the top 10 best performing state schools across our area, official figures from the Department for Education show.

Cams Hill, Brookfield Community, Crofton and Neville Lovett schools all celebrated big leaps in their pass rates for five good GCSEs including English and maths.

David Wilmot, head of Cams Hill which recently won an outstanding Ofsted, said coming fourth in the local league table was the ‘icing on the cake’.

He said: ‘I’m very proud of our children and teachers. They worked really hard to get these excellent results.

‘Getting five good GCSEs with English and maths is crucial because it opens doors to all the courses at sixth form colleges and gives youngsters a lot of choice whatever they choose to do in life.

‘I don’t keep my eye on league tables but it’s definitely an added bonus to have done so well.’

Six out of eight Fareham and Gosport state schools equalled or improved on their GCSE pass rates last year.

The biggest leap in results came from Neville Lovett, ranked in tenth place, which boasted an 18 per cent leap in good GCSE passes to 63 per cent.

Head Nadine Powrie said: ‘We were thrilled with the results – and I’d like to hope we can improve on them this year.

‘Last year, 48 per cent of our early maths entries achieved a C or above, and this year 58 per cent achieved good grades.’

But there are even more telling statistics that are being published with today’s results.

A new table reveals the percentage of underachieving primary school leavers who won five good GCSEs five years down the line – against the odds.

Parents can also see for the first time the percentage of primary school high-fliers who were expected to get As and Bs at GCSE – but failed to win five good GCSEs.

Richard Carlyle, head of Bridgemary School, where just 83 per cent of these children made the grade, admits maths let the side down.

He said: ‘The results were disappointing but we’ve put lots of new things in place, including new middle leadership and curriculum for maths.’

Today’s tables also show increasing numbers of pupils gaining the English Baccalaureate award for five set subjects which education secretary Michael Gove is keen to make the new benchmark.