Former Britain’s Got Talent stars warn about cyber-bullying

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POP stars visited a school to educate children about the dangers of cyber-bullying.

Misunderstood formed after performing on Britain’s Got Talent as part of a dance act.

(l-r) George Browning, 13, Fiona Brown, 13, Jeffrey Okyere, Stephan Benson, Ollie Hopkinson, 13, and Isobel Goodall, 13. 'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (142867-3)

(l-r) George Browning, 13, Fiona Brown, 13, Jeffrey Okyere, Stephan Benson, Ollie Hopkinson, 13, and Isobel Goodall, 13. 'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (142867-3)

Jeffrey Okyere and Stephan Benson are touring the country talking to children about being safe online.

The duo sang and danced to two separate groups of pupils and gave a talk at St John’s College in Southsea.

Jeffrey said: ‘It’s important for us to educate children about cyber-bullying because everyone uses the internet and some might not be able to use it in the right way.

‘Why not have young people like us who have been through it, who are stepping into the world of music and can educate them on the right way and the wrong way and how to use the internet?’

Stephan added: ‘We are making them have fun. They are screaming and dancing and we’re putting across the message so it sinks in.’

During the workshops there was a dance-off between students.

Massie Letten, 18, was invited on to the stage in the dance off and said. ‘Misunderstood had a clever approach to an important message. Today was a good refresher of what we already know about staying safe online.’

Sam Reeve, 18, in Year 13 said: ‘It was good to be reminded today that the internet can be a dangerous area if not used properly. I like to think I am sensible enough to know that what goes online stays online forever – and it could come back to embarrass you in the future. Misunderstood were informative – but they made the session really fun.’

Caroline Taliadoros is head of careers at St John’s. She said: ‘The fact that it’s young people talking to young people will have more of an impact.

‘I’m hoping that they will take on board some of the messages about being safe online as well as learning to respect other people. It’s an original way of putting across quite a serious message.’