Gosport school celebrates Ofsted step-up

Pupils are all smiles following Siskin Junior Schools glowing OFSTED report. (left to right), Harry Whittaker (seven), Niamh Abbott (10), Sinead Harmer (nine), Axl Rose (eight).'Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (131999-2)

Pupils are all smiles following Siskin Junior Schools glowing OFSTED report. (left to right), Harry Whittaker (seven), Niamh Abbott (10), Sinead Harmer (nine), Axl Rose (eight).'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (131999-2)

Portsmouth Grammar School

Portsmouth mayor left ‘speechless’ after city school makes £1,800 donation to appeal

0
Have your say

GOOD teaching and an improvement in pupils’ behaviour has helped a Rowner school to climb up the Ofsted ladder.

Siskin Juniors in Gosport has been graded ‘good’ in all areas – up from its previous inspection when it was graded ‘satisfactory’.

Inspectors said teaching is consistently good and has been for at least two years.

The executive headteacher Sian Thornton has been praised for her outstanding drive and ambition for the school.

And the report added that pupils make good progress from below-average starting points.

Ms Thornton said: ‘We’re thrilled. We’ve been working hard at Siskin Junior School and it’s been improving over a period of time.

‘It’s great to have the validation from Ofsted that we are a good school.

‘The quality of teaching is always good and some of it is outstanding. It’s a terrific team of teachers and learning support assistants.

‘Since the schools were federated there is a great team spirit between them. We want to give the children the best deal from the start.’

Ms Thornton said she hopes the bad reputation Rowner has had will now change.

‘I hope this is a huge boost,’ she said.

‘I hope it makes the people in Rowner who work hard and do the best to bring up their children well and get a good education for them, I hope they feel their hard work with their children is being recognised as well.’

Now, Ofsted said the school needs to build on the good teaching to make it consistently outstanding.

‘We want to polish up our teaching,’ Ms Thornton.

‘Some of it’s outstanding already but there are some plans about what we can do to make it consistently outstanding.

‘We want children to be achieving more by the time that are 11 years of age.

‘We want to be sending them on to secondary school with high levels of achievement.

‘That’s going to be our aim before the next inspection – to get to that outstanding level.’

Back to the top of the page