Hampshire students’ top designs to help disabled people

IDEAS Oliver Reeves, 14, and Jamie Moore, 12, from Cams Hill School, who are both able-bodied and were part of a team that designed a scoop for a wheelchair user to play football. Picture: Paul Jacobs (121114-7)
IDEAS Oliver Reeves, 14, and Jamie Moore, 12, from Cams Hill School, who are both able-bodied and were part of a team that designed a scoop for a wheelchair user to play football. Picture: Paul Jacobs (121114-7)
Newbridge Junior School Picture: Maria Bujor

Children in Need: Junior School has a pretty perfect Pudsey plan

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A ‘HANDY’ invention that allows disabled people to scoop up and place tees and golf balls won the day for a team of schoolboy inventors.

City of Portsmouth Boys youngsters scooped first prize at this year’s WeCan Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) challenge with their ‘handy tee’ design.

Jack Walters, 14, on the winning side, said: ‘I’m really pleased – it was good to work on a product to help disabled people enjoy sport.’

Competition from schools across The News’ region and beyond who all came up with products to help disabled people was tough.

A team from Cams Hill School in Fareham came up with a new ball game for wheelchair-bound people to play alongside able-bodied people.

City of Portsmouth Girls offered a knife with handles that are suited to a range of problems, as well as a cup that stops the fluids spilling when your hands shake.

And students at Crookhorn College of Technology invented a Braille version of snakes and ladders.

All the students had worked with Warings experts in the weeks leading up to the challenge based around the Portsmouth Football Club’s Respectability Programme to raise awareness of disabilities through sport.

Mike Smith, head of City Boys, said: ‘This is our second win in three years – I’m thrilled.

‘They put a huge amount of work into the project which shows tremendous innovation and a real understanding of issues people face.’

Philippe Jouy, Warings managing director, said: ‘We never fail to be impressed by the inventiveness of the pupils and the way they understand how the technical demands of their ideas need to be considered carefully.’