Heads, shoulders, knees, toes and a world record bid

IN TIME Nikita Carrington, William George, Rebecca Byrne and Jonathan Smith at St Thomas More's Preschool, Havant.    ''Picture: Allan Hutchings (110747-285)
IN TIME Nikita Carrington, William George, Rebecca Byrne and Jonathan Smith at St Thomas More's Preschool, Havant. ''Picture: Allan Hutchings (110747-285)
Vice-Chancellor Professor Graham Galbraith
. Picture by Helen Yates

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HUNDREDS of happy under-fives joined forces to simultaneously sing a children’s favourite yesterday in an attempt to break a world record.

The event, named Chatterbox Challenge, saw children in various locations across the area sing Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.

DANCE Freddie Fincham, Charlie Cole, Godefroy Canonne from St Jude's Church Nursery

DANCE Freddie Fincham, Charlie Cole, Godefroy Canonne from St Jude's Church Nursery

The event was organised by children’s communication charity, I Can, in a bid to promote the development of children’s speech, language and communication skills.

More than 70 children and 12 adults gathered at St Thomas More’s Pre-School, in Havant, to take part in the giant singalong.

Maureen Thompson, the pre-school’s community development manager, said: ‘All the children really enjoyed it.

‘They were very excited beforehand and as they were doing the actions, they were keeping an eye on the adults to make sure they got it right.’

A group of 14 children from St Jude’s Church Nursery, in Southsea, were among the 102 singing the song at Cascades Shopping Centre, in Portsmouth.

In Waterlooville, 53 children from the Acorn Centre, in Wecock, took part in the national event, as did 88 in Padnell Infant School, in Cowplain.

A further 104 kids took part in Woodcroft Primary School, also in Cowplain.

Similar performances were staged across the UK – all at 11am – as part of the nationwide bid to break the record. They will find out if they have broken the record – which stands at 1,634 – later this year once all figures are collected.