It’s a whole new game if you can’t see

WRESTLE Judo coach Stephen Kemish, from Fleming Park Judo Club in Eastleigh, with Stephanie Burman, 11, from Hayling College, having a go at Judo blindfolded. (123078-3366)
WRESTLE Judo coach Stephen Kemish, from Fleming Park Judo Club in Eastleigh, with Stephanie Burman, 11, from Hayling College, having a go at Judo blindfolded. (123078-3366)
Lee Hider with his work at the exhibition

Students snap their take on city life for exhibition

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IMAGINE trying archery for the first time and trying to hit the bullseye.

Now picture doing this – but blindfolded.

BOW Open Sight volunteer Donna Eastman with Elliott Opie, 10, from Mill Rythe Junior School, during blindfolded archery. (123078-6724)

BOW Open Sight volunteer Donna Eastman with Elliott Opie, 10, from Mill Rythe Junior School, during blindfolded archery. (123078-6724)

This was the challenge to hundreds of schoolchildren from across the area who gathered at Hayling College.

The sports day was organised by Open Sight, a Hampshire charity working with people who have, or are at risk of developing, sight loss.

Many of the sport coaches who helped yesterday were blind themselves.

Children tried out football, cricket, archery, judo, rock climbing and goalball, a team sport designed for blind athletes.

Tessa Barrett, chief executive of the charity, said: ‘One boy doing archery hit the bullseye. His face was worth a million pounds. He felt like a real champion.

‘It teaches children that blind people have a lot more to overcome than they have.’

Phil Bridgwater, 41, manager of Farlington’s Sainsburys’, which supported the Paralympics, tried blindfolded football and said the experience was ‘humbling’. Organisers wanted to thank Hayling College and PC Debbie Surridge.