New clinic set to open at Portsmouth school for children with hearing problems

HANDS ON From left, Jayvyn Mouessi, Riley Baker and sensory impairment co-ordinator Donna Evans and Northern Parade School, in Hilsea. Picture: Allan Hutchings (133548-682)
HANDS ON From left, Jayvyn Mouessi, Riley Baker and sensory impairment co-ordinator Donna Evans and Northern Parade School, in Hilsea. Picture: Allan Hutchings (133548-682)
24/8/17

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A SCHOOL in Portsmouth is opening a clinic for children with hearing problems.

Northern Parade Infant and Junior Schools in Hilsea will hold a monthly clinic for children to have their hearing aids checked, cleaned and adjusted.

It will initially be run for children at the school, but it is hoped that eventually it will cater for children from schools across the city.

Donna Evans, sensory impairment co-ordinator at the school, said: ‘We have been trained so we can do this every month to make sure the equipment is working 100 per cent.

‘If the hearing aid isn’t working 100 per cent it will have an impact on the lessons.

‘Anyone in the school and their siblings can come in.

‘It’s to make sure that the things that they are hearing are what they should be.

‘We will have people coming in from other schools to use the resources that we run.’

Ms Evans said it is a useful clinic for both the children and the parents, as normally parents would have to go up to Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham to get hearing aids fixed.

‘If there’s a problem with the hearing aid, generally if you don’t have a resource you have to go to the hospital,’ she said.

‘With us, we can look at it first.

‘We can fix the problem and it doesn’t impact on the children’s school life.

‘If we can look at it straight away then it’s only an hour they have to go without their hearing aid.’

Meanwhile, the school is also organising a Sensory Awareness Day, which will take place on Thursday, February 13.

The children will spend the day taking part in activities that also give them an insight into what it is like for a sensory-impaired person and also some indication of how some of their friends experience school.

Representatives from different charities have been invited into the school to support the activities taking place.

Ms Evans added: ‘It’s trying to bring in awareness about what a sensory impairment does.

‘The children will have a whole day learning about what it’s like to be visually or hearing impaired.’

The school will also be unveiling its new sensory room and sensory garden which it hopes will have an impact on the children’s learning.

The school has had equipment and materials donated by local businesses.