Portsmouth academy does Children in Need Tapathon

Julian Brown (60) with his family (l-r) son-in-law Paul Saunders (29), daughter Sara Saunders (28), wife Karen Brown (60) and daughter Kate Brown (31).

Picture: Sarah Standing (170958-5461) PPP-170721-151239001

Much-loved Horndean PE teacher retires after 35 years

0
Have your say

STEPPING up and making sure they gave it their best, members of a dance school took part in a Children in Need world record-breaking feat.

Members of the Giselle Academy, who meet in St Mark’s House, Derby Road, North End, joined scores of other schools for the national attempt.

The Giselle Academy took on a Guinness World Record Tapathon for Children in Need on Sunday

The Giselle Academy took on a Guinness World Record Tapathon for Children in Need on Sunday

Sixty tapdancers wearing Pudsey Bear ears tapped along to Pharrell Williams’ Happy twice during yesterday’s attempt.

There were two routines – a complicated one for older dancers and a simple one for youngsters.

Dancers ranged from the ages of five to 50 years old.

Karen Lee, of the academy members who organised the event, said: ‘We wanted to raise awareness and money of Children in Need, and highlight to our dancers that not all children have the opportunities they have.

‘I started organising things in June and we started rehearsing in September.

‘It has been really fun and exciting rehearsing for the record attempt, we really hope we can pull it off.

‘We had to take a picture of all those taking part and send it to officials at the Guinness Book of World Records, then at exactly 1pm we all took part in the dance.’

The academy has raised £600 by buying official tapathon T-shirts.

The current record of the largest number of tap dancers across multiple venues stands at 7,596.

Emily Blades, 11, has been dancing since she was aged three, and was happy to take part in the bid.

She said: ‘It’s really been fun doing this challenge.

‘I love dancing and I’ve been able to see my friends more.

‘We had been practising the routine at home a lot.

‘It’s also helped me see not all children have things like I do, and hopefully we can help them.’

And Amelie Evans, nine, said the simple dance steps meant she enjoyed the record-breaking attempt.

She said: ‘The dance steps weren’t too difficult, so you could have a good go at the 
dance.

‘I really hope we break the world record.’

The tapathon was organised by The Performers Project and this is the fifth year.

Adjudicators will reveal whether the record has been broken later this week.