Portsmouth school welcomes Chinese teachers as part of exchange programme

Jon Platt

Dad found guilty in school absence case

  • Two teachers from Shanghai have spent time in city school
  • It’s part of an exchange programme through the Solent Maths Hub
  • Pupils have responded well to teaching methods
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TEACHERS from Shanghai had a taste of life in a maths lesson in England as part of an exchange programme.

Through the Solent Maths Hub, two teachers from China are spending three weeks teaching at Trafalgar School in Hilsea.

Pupil Jack Tomkinson and teacher Amy Lu working out a maths problem at Trafalgar School, London Road, Hilsea'''Picture: Allan Hutchings (151726-028)

Pupil Jack Tomkinson and teacher Amy Lu working out a maths problem at Trafalgar School, London Road, Hilsea'''Picture: Allan Hutchings (151726-028)

Amy Lu and Navy Wang spent three days observing maths lessons at schools in the city including Admiral Lord Nelson in Copnor and King Richard in Paulsgrove.

Amy said: ‘I feel very happy and excited because it’s a challenge for me through the gap of language.

‘I don’t know the background of the students’ learning so it’s a challenge for me as a young teacher.

‘I can learn a lot from the teachers here.’

I feel very happy and excited because it’s a challenge for me through the gap of language

Amy Lu, teacher

Amy added she has noticed that splitting the children up into groups depending on their abilities is a good idea.

In China, children of all abilities are taught in one class.

In September, a group of teachers from Portsmouth went to Shanghai as part of the programme, to teach maths there and to observe lessons and use some of the successful elements on their return.

Amy Fuller is one of the teachers who went.

She said: ‘The Chinese style looks a lot more in detail at topics and really develops children’s understanding of topics.

‘The whole style of teaching is to prevent misconceptions coming up. Children are developing their understanding. All the boys have taken to it well.

‘It’s about making sure the children understand everything before moving on.’

Ryan Wilshaw, 12, added: ‘It’s more exciting because we have learnt different methods.

‘It makes finding answers easier.’

Alex Bleach, 12, said: ‘It’s given me a sense of variety because with all the methods the teacher allowed us to choose which one benefits us most.’

Teachers from across the area have visited the school to observe the lessons.

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