Pride as city secondary scores top GCSE results

JOY From left Springfield pupils Lauren Veal, Laura Allen, Charlotte Payne, Lauren Wood, Sophie Cufley and Amy Sparks celebrate their exam results.  (113037-810)
JOY From left Springfield pupils Lauren Veal, Laura Allen, Charlotte Payne, Lauren Wood, Sophie Cufley and Amy Sparks celebrate their exam results. (113037-810)

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A SECONDARY in Portsmouth is now officially the second highest performing state school across The News’ area, official figures from the Department for Education show.

Springfield’s blinding exam performance last year – when 75 per cent of pupils achieved five good GCSEs including English and maths – has seen it rise from eighth to second place in local league tables.

Head Lynn Evans said: ‘I’m delighted with the result.

‘It’s a great opportunity half-way through the year to give fresh praise to staff working with year 11s, ensuring they continue to do well right across the curriculum.’

Seven out of 10 city schools improved on their five good GCSE pass rates this year.

The biggest leap in results came from Charter Academy which boasted a 15 per cent leap to 39 per cent.

Mike Smith, head of City Boys, is still celebrating his school’s 50 per cent good GCSE pass rate

He said: ‘We were told we’d struggle to get over 30 per cent, but we managed 50.

‘These results are my proudest in my whole career.’

But there are even more telling statistics that are being published in our paper today.

A new table reveals the percentage of underachieving primary school leavers who won five good GCSEs five years down the line – against the odds.

The best performers for the whole area were Springfield and City Boys, where 15 and 13 per cent of youngsters achieved top grades respectively.

Parents can also see for the first time the number of primary school high-fliers who were expected to get As and Bs at GCSE – but failed to win five good GCSEs.

At Priory School, where just 84 per cent of these children made the grade, new head James Humphries admits maths results let the side down.

He said: ‘One hundred per cent of our high achievers made the expected progress in English but that wasn’t the case for maths.

‘Our results were not good enough but we have put a lot of things in place to ensure that will change.’

Today’s tables also show increasing numbers of pupils gaining the English Baccalaureate award for five set subjects which education secretary Michael Gove is keen to make the new benchmark.