Pupils get a taste of Africa

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CHILDREN have been getting a taste of life in Africa as part of a bid to open their eyes to the wider world.

The pupils at Meon Infant School in Southsea have been making their own African masks.

Pupils at Meon Infant School in Milton learn how to make an African mask ''(front left to right) Abigail Awinda (6) and Jessica Clark (7) and their classmates from Year 2 Red Class show off their African masks ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (131692-6989)

Pupils at Meon Infant School in Milton learn how to make an African mask ''(front left to right) Abigail Awinda (6) and Jessica Clark (7) and their classmates from Year 2 Red Class show off their African masks ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (131692-6989)

It came after the school won an International School Award last year which recognises work done to encourage children to understand more about the world they live in.

Sandria Lipscomb, Year 2 teacher and international co-ordinator at the school, said it’s been good to get recognition for the work that the school does.

‘The award recognised the international work that we do within the school,’ she said.

‘Being an infant school we think it’s really important to stop any prejudice and to break down any barriers children might build up.

‘We try to introduce children at an early age and to get them to realise that there is a big world out there and to see how they fit into the big world and recognise their place in it.’

Meon Infants has linked up with a school in France to find out how the two countries differ.

They have also raised money for a school in Uganda to help provide them with more resources.

‘It’s getting children to see the differences within the cultures and things like that,’ Mrs Lipscomb added.

‘There is so much that we can access now.

‘We started off in our school club and we built on that.’

This week the school is celebrating arts week and the children have also been painting, dancing, drumming and dressing up – all with an African theme.

‘It’s a celebration of the arts with an African theme running through it,’ Mrs Lipscomb said.

‘The children loved it. The African masks were really good.

‘They felt like real models out there having their photos taken.’

The school was presented with a certificate and a flag as part of the ISA.

The ISA is an accreditation scheme for curriculum-based international work in schools.

It encourages schools to develop an international ethos.