Pupils get an insight into what life is like for children in Nepal

28/5/2012 (EB) ''Waterloo School in Waterlooville are twinned with Rampur Higher Secondary School in Nepal and have two of their teachers currently visiting the school.''Pictured is: (left) Prem Shintan and Naresh Nath with children (l-r) Alfie Eames (5), Marshall Elston (7) and Ashley Wood (6) during a Jubilee activities class. ''Picture: Sarah Standing (121860-6135)
28/5/2012 (EB) ''Waterloo School in Waterlooville are twinned with Rampur Higher Secondary School in Nepal and have two of their teachers currently visiting the school.''Pictured is: (left) Prem Shintan and Naresh Nath with children (l-r) Alfie Eames (5), Marshall Elston (7) and Ashley Wood (6) during a Jubilee activities class. ''Picture: Sarah Standing (121860-6135)
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FOR pupils at Rampur High Secondary School, in Nepal, there is no time for homework because most have to work in the evenings.

Classes have up to 70 pupils and the technology UK schools take for granted is something they can only dream of.

Despite their differences staff and pupils have forged a close friendship with their counterparts at the Waterloo School, in Waterlooville.

And teachers Naresh Bikramnath and Prem Shintan are spending a week at the special school, in Warfield Avenue, learning how they do things.

It is a return visit after teachers Deborah McComb and Deirdre Bell visited Rampur in January.

Mr Shintan said: ‘Everything here is completely different to how we do things and we are learning a lot.

‘In Nepal there are two kinds of school; private and government.

‘In government schools we follow set rules and regulations and we do not look at the wellbeing of the children, just pure learning.

‘We are learning so much from Waterloo School about looking after the child’s wellbeing too. That is something we are now moving towards.

‘The children are not set homework as they are out collecting water or grass for their families after school. They must work.’

The Global School Partnership funded the exchange between the two schools and both have learned a lot.

Pupils have become pen pals and are learning about each other’s cultures.

Mr Shintan and his colleague Mr Bikramnath spent a day in London on Sunday with headteacher Anna Brown.

At the top of the list of sights to see were Tower Bridge and Big Ben – which Rampur pupils have been learning about in class.

Mr Bikramnath said: ‘It will be so much easier to teach them about Big Ben now that we have seen it for ourselves.

‘We have films and pictures we show them but this is the best way as we can describe it for ourselves.’

Mrs McComb described her visit to Nepal as a ‘sensory overload’ and was amazed at the lengths the children went to to learn.

She said: ‘It was exhilarating and very humbling.

‘The children don’t have to go to school, there is no law forcing them.

‘But still 85 to 90 per cent make the journey every day without appropriate clothes or footwear.’