Pupils get technical at fair as the wonders of science are laid bare

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YOUNGSTERS were given an insight into the world of science and technology at a fair.

Pupils were at Fareham College’s Cemast at Daedalus at the start of a three-day science, technology engineering and maths [Stem] fair.

Alison Hume and Richard Aylward-Wilson of DSTL with pupils from Gomer Junior School, learning how to survive a radiation leak.
Picture: Habibur Rahman (170349-57)

Alison Hume and Richard Aylward-Wilson of DSTL with pupils from Gomer Junior School, learning how to survive a radiation leak. Picture: Habibur Rahman (170349-57)

Over the course of the event, nearly 700 pupils from 13 primary schools will have attended.

Eloise Triggs, nine, was at the stall with Wickham Laboratories learning about germs.

The Year 6 Crofton Anne Dale Junior School pupil said: ‘It’s fun and exciting.

‘I liked looking at the different germs and they’re good.’

James Bucknall and Frankie Peckham of Portsmouth Water, with pupils from Orchard Lea Junior School learning how water reaches  people's homes. Picture: Habibur Rahman (170349-55)

James Bucknall and Frankie Peckham of Portsmouth Water, with pupils from Orchard Lea Junior School learning how water reaches people's homes. Picture: Habibur Rahman (170349-55)

More than 30 organisations and companies will appear at the fair over the week.

Members of the University of Portsmouth’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences were there yesterday with animal skulls.

And Year 5 Crofton Anne Dale Junior School pupil Joseph Webber was holding fossils and animal skulls.

He said: ‘I looked at fossils and bones.

‘It’s cool because some of them are quite big and heavy.

‘I used to want to dig up fossils, I still might do that.’

It is the 20th year that EBP South has put on the fair and the third year at Cemast.

Pupils were also able to explore the state-of-the-art workshop facilities at the college.

They were taking part in 25-minute interactive Stem activities, designed to hook their interest in the field.

James Bucknall, a water quality scientist at Portsmouth Water, was hosting an activity with pupils fitting model pipes from a water supply to a model house.

‘Science and technology isn’t really the thing that kids go for most – it’s normally football or being a pop star.

‘This gives them insight.’

EBP South’s project manager Jacquie Jones said the children were able to get hands on at the event.

She said: ‘It’s so interactive and they have a go, it’s not a career fair with leaflets and talking, we give them a go.

‘They’re quite young so they’re very enthusiastic.

‘They’re quite open with questions.’

The event has won the backing of Councillor Peter Edgar, executive member for education at Hampshire County Council.

He said: ‘The Stem subjects have become, particularly since Brexit, the most important subject taught in our schools.’

‘It’s absolutely vital that we encourage children to develop an interest in those subjects, and particularly girls.’