Pupils open their eyes to the world of work

Children from King Richard School and Miltoncross Academy visit the offices of Douglas Stafford at 1000 Lakeside. Picture: Allan Hutchings (143336-900)
Children from King Richard School and Miltoncross Academy visit the offices of Douglas Stafford at 1000 Lakeside. Picture: Allan Hutchings (143336-900)
Julian Brown (60) with his family (l-r) son-in-law Paul Saunders (29), daughter Sara Saunders (28), wife Karen Brown (60) and daughter Kate Brown (31).

Picture: Sarah Standing (170958-5461) PPP-170721-151239001

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BUSINESSES opened their doors to schoolchildren to give them an idea about jobs available to them in the future.

The event was held at Lakeside 1000 in North Harbour where youngsters had a chance to explore their options for when they leave school.

Firms gave presentations to the children to let them know what sort of jobs could be open to them.

They included Verisona Law, cycling company Wiggle and researchers Douglas Stafford.

Sherry Davis, 13, is a student at Miltoncross School.

She said: ‘It’s a good idea because we can see all the things this place is offering.

‘It’s cool because we’re going to pick our options at the end of the year.

‘It’s a good idea to see what sort of stuff they do here.

‘It makes you feel like you have more variety and choice because you know what’s going on. This gives a glimpse into the future.’

JD Davis, 13, is a pupil at St Edmund’s Catholic School in Landport.

‘It’s a good experience because we are learning about different things in Portsmouth,’ he said. ‘It will help a lot. We have learnt about how we can make things we use every day out of different items.’

Mirella Jager, 14, is also a pupil at St Edmund’s. She said: ‘It helps determine what I’m going to be when I’m older. It’s helping me think about it more.

‘I want to do something with graphics and ICT and business.

‘Here we get to see what kind of jobs there are and see what we can do.’

Ben Dowling, a youth consultant from Question Me UK, helped organise the event. He said: ‘It’s to raise their aspirations.

‘Most of the young people are from backgrounds that don’t necessarily normally see and hear about places like them so we want to give them an opportunity to see what’s available. It’s about making them aware they don’t have to leave school and do the same job that their parents do. It’s about opening their eyes to the wider world of work.’