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Pupils’ touching tribute to those who died in war

(l-r) Bethany Baxter, Rhys Williams, Andreea Fracas-Dan (corr), Phil Bridgwater (corr) store manager Sainsbury's Farlington, Howard Payne headteacher Medina Primary School and Sgt Mandy Vaughan REME.   Children from Medina Primary School have written down their thoughts about remembrance and posted them on giant poppies. The poppies are displayed at Sainsbury's, Farlington.   Picture: Allan Hutchings (123616-153)

(l-r) Bethany Baxter, Rhys Williams, Andreea Fracas-Dan (corr), Phil Bridgwater (corr) store manager Sainsbury's Farlington, Howard Payne headteacher Medina Primary School and Sgt Mandy Vaughan REME. Children from Medina Primary School have written down their thoughts about remembrance and posted them on giant poppies. The poppies are displayed at Sainsbury's, Farlington. Picture: Allan Hutchings (123616-153)

CHILDREN at a city school have written touching messages of support to mark Remembrance Day.

Youngsters from Medina Primary School in Cosham wrote messages which have been pinned up in the Sainsbury’s store in Farlington.

It allows the children to join in with Remembrance Day, which this year falls on Sunday when they won’t be in school.

The children wrote about what Remembrance Day means to them in a bid to help boost the sales of poppies in the store.

Headteacher Howard Payne said: ‘Every year it’s important to ensure that children never forget the significance of people losing their lives.

‘There aren’t many of our children who have got a parent that has been serving at the moment but they have got grandparents or relatives.

‘They need to be aware of this.’

And Mr Payne added that the children have worked hard to write inspirational and memorable messages.

‘Some of them are incredibly moving,’ he said.

‘They are very aware of the significance of the impact on families.’

A special display has been made up on the window in the store for customers to see.

Bethany Baxter, 10, a Year 6 pupil, said: ‘It’s important we remember the people who fought for us – we could have been living in a stricter environment. We wouldn’t have been able to live freely.’

Phil Bridgwater, store manager, said: ‘It’s something that the company have done this year more so than ever to raise the profile of those that served.

‘This is a poignant approach to recognise how events like the war have affected both the young people and those still in action.’

Sergeant Mandy Vaughan, who volunteered for the Royal British Legion to sell poppies at the store, added: ‘I think it’s great that the kids are being told what the poppies represent.

‘They need to be aware of what’s happened all through history.’

 

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