Snozzcumbers and mice are a recipe for success at school

Children at Flying Bull Primary School in Portsmouth dress as Roald Dahl characters for the day. (left to right), Jake Creasey (nine), Kai Brown (eight), Maisie Martin (eight), Jack Holness (10), Millie Lapins (10)

Children at Flying Bull Primary School in Portsmouth dress as Roald Dahl characters for the day. (left to right), Jake Creasey (nine), Kai Brown (eight), Maisie Martin (eight), Jack Holness (10), Millie Lapins (10)

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COLOURFUL characters flew straight off the pages of Roald Dahl’s books and into a primary school.

Children at Flying Bull Primary in Buckland, Portsmouth, became witches, oompa loompas, Willy Wonkas, BFGs, Twits, Matildas and much more.

The fun came on the final day of a full week dedicated to the children’s author, who would have celebrated his 95th birthday next week.

Youngsters took part in a range of unusual activities, like cooking and selling delicacies including snozzcumber jelly (inspired by The BFG), chocolate mice (The Witches), and Danny the Champion of the World flapjacks.

Head Deamonn Hewett-Dale read George’s Marvellous Medicine in assembly.

Teachers set poetry, writing and painting assignments based on Roald Dahl characters, and children devised games and quizzes relating to his books.

On the final day, the mini Roald Dahl experts dressed to impress.

Five lucky eight to 11-year-olds unwrapped their Wonka chocolate bars to discover a ‘golden ticket’ to attend a West End production of Matilda the Musical.

There were also two ‘golden tickets’ up for grabs for younger children.

The winners of those took home a DVD of Matilda and two books buried in envelopes packed with sweets.

Jake Needham, 10, who was dressed in Roald Dahl’s favourite colour yellow, said: ‘I’ve had an amazing time.

‘My favourite part of the week was making chocolate mice – that’s what The Witches in Roald Dahl’s book turned little children into.’

Mya Gonella, six, was so intrigued by the George’s Marvellous Medicine readings in assembly that she read extra chapters at home to find out what happened next.

She said: ‘The book was so exciting so I couldn’t wait.

‘Roald Dahl is an amazing writer – his books are so funny and you learn a lot of new words from them, even though some of the words are made up!’

Laylah Bell, nine, transformed into a bright orange Oompa Loompa from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with bushy white eyebrows and white hair.

She was also one of two Key Stage One ‘golden ticket’ winners.

‘When I saw the ticket I was so happy’, she said.

‘It was a brilliant way to end a brilliant week.

‘Roald Dahl’s books are so exciting, they are like fun versions of fairytales. ’

Izzy Lewis, teacher and reading manager, who organised the week, said: ‘In the world of Roald Dahl, nothing is impossible.

‘His books got me hooked on reading when I was a child and the children’s reaction to his books has been fantastic.’

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