Staff and children praised by Ofsted after inspection

22/07/13  RS''Headteacher Karen Stock and pupils at Arundel Court Junior School in Portsmouth celebrate the schools recent good OFSTED results in front of a mural of the schools values.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (132036-1)
22/07/13 RS''Headteacher Karen Stock and pupils at Arundel Court Junior School in Portsmouth celebrate the schools recent good OFSTED results in front of a mural of the schools values.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (132036-1)
From left, University of Portsmouth head of brand strategy and corporate communications Emma Fields, Portsmouth FC commercial director Anna Mitchell, university governor and former Portsmouth FC President David Willan, football club CEO Mark Catlin and university vice chancellor Professor Graham Galbraith

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AN IMPROVEMENT in teaching and excellent behaviour by children has helped a Portsmouth school in a recent Ofsted inspection.

Arundel Court Junior School in Landport, Portsmouth, has been graded as good with outstanding features.

Inspectors said that pupils make good progress in their learning and some achievement is outstanding.

All teaching is good or better across the school. And pupils enjoy coming to school and behave excellently.

And the report said that leaders have secured significant improvements in teaching and achievement since the last inspection in November 2009.

Headteacher Karen Stocks said: ‘We are elated with the outcome.

‘All staff and the children are pleased with the judgements of the school.

‘The children want to do their best and get the best outcomes. They have done a lot of one-to-one tuition and extra work to get these results.

‘It’s very much got a community feel. That shines through.

‘There is a lot of reference to our school values and what we believe is important.

‘We have got a strong governing body who have a lot to do with the school and are involved with the school.

‘They want the best for the children and the families.

‘It’s about team work in school. We want to raise high expectations.’

To become an outstanding school, inspectors said that the rates of progress in writing need to be improved.

And the school needs to ensure leaders check the quality of marking is consistent across all year groups by making regular checks that the school’s marking policy is being used.

‘We identified that writing is still a challenge for us, particularly for a lot of boys,’ Miss Stocks added.

‘Our curriculum has to really be exciting and purposeful to engage the children in writing.’

Now, Miss Stocks said the school is aiming to become outstanding across the board by the next inspection.

The school will become a primary school from September when it joins up with the infant school.

‘That’s going to be our new challenge – coming together as one school,’ she said.

‘We are really excited about it particularly for the parents because in Year 2 they don’t have to apply for a place in Year 3. We are becoming a popular school.’