Video: Schoolchildren challenge speeding motorists to drive safely

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CHILDREN have been helping the police target speeding motorists as part of a new campaign.

Police officers and PCSOs from the Waterlooville Sector Safer Neighbourhoods Team spent the day working with Year 5 children from Queen’s Inclosure Primary School.

Police traffic officers and local officers based at Waterlooville showed children from Queen's Inclosure Primary School the hazards of speeding cars in an unusual exercise in Park Lane Cowplain near to its junction with Idsworth Road ''Children (left to right) Tyler Crawley, Joseph Gargaro, Keiran Cotton, and Alfie Edney with (left to righy) PC Laura Greenlalgh, and PC Neil Lancaster ''''Picture: Malcolm Wells (133254-0462)

Police traffic officers and local officers based at Waterlooville showed children from Queen's Inclosure Primary School the hazards of speeding cars in an unusual exercise in Park Lane Cowplain near to its junction with Idsworth Road ''Children (left to right) Tyler Crawley, Joseph Gargaro, Keiran Cotton, and Alfie Edney with (left to righy) PC Laura Greenlalgh, and PC Neil Lancaster ''''Picture: Malcolm Wells (133254-0462)

Motorists driving along Park Lane in Waterlooville were stopped if they were exceeding the 30mph limit.

They were given the choice of paying a £100 fine and having three points on their licence, or taking part in the children’s survey. The police are hoping that youngsters educating motorists might make them think twice about their speed.

Lollipop man Ray Elsmore was killed in nearby Tempest Avenue when he was hit by a car in December last year.

Inspector Dave Humphries, from Waterlooville police station, said: ‘Our key message is that speed limits are there for a reason. The difference of a few miles per hour can be the difference between life and death if something unexpected happens. The faster someone is driving, the less time they have to stop and the higher the chances of a collision resulting in death.

‘Us explaining this to motorists is one thing.

‘But when children are saying it to motorists stopped speeding near their school, we believe it will have a more powerful and lasting influence.’

Oliver Spencer, nine, said: ‘If we ask them questions they will think more carefully about driving safely so they won’t do it in future.’

Headteacher Jo Allen added: ‘We always welcome the chance to work with the local police and this is a great opportunity to assist in tackling something that is an issue for our local community.

‘The children will learn about road safety and the significance of speeding issues. Hopefully, in years to come when they are the motorists, the children will remember what they are learning now.’

Lauren Paul, 22, was accused of causing Mr Elsmore’s death by dangerous driving. A retrial will be held after a jury failed to reach a verdict.