Youngsters invited to activities
to prepare for secondary school

Pupils take part in a transition summer school at Mayfeld School in Portsmouth for the move up to secondary school in Year 7. '(left to right), Mishka Cook and Iman Al-Sharrai both eleven enjoy an embroidery class.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (132313-2)
Pupils take part in a transition summer school at Mayfeld School in Portsmouth for the move up to secondary school in Year 7. '(left to right), Mishka Cook and Iman Al-Sharrai both eleven enjoy an embroidery class.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (132313-2)
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Children have been making cakes, sewing buttons and taking part in sporting activities.

The 11-year-olds have been visiting Mayfield School in North End as part of a bid to make the transition from primary to secondary school easier.

This year, more than 80 children signed up to the scheme.

Mary Read is the summer school co-ordinator.

She said: ‘It’s making the transition from primary school to senior school easier for the pupils, for us and for their parents.

‘They are coming from some schools where possibly they are the only people in that class coming to Mayfield and they don’t know anyone.

‘We have had them outside at the door at 8.30am waiting to come in.’

And Mary hailed the idea has been a huge success.

‘They have been great,’ she said.

‘There have been lots of activities. It’s using those new skills and meeting people. This is a massive school for them.

‘A lot of them are nervous and are going to get lost.’

As part of the summer school, children also had some lessons in English and maths, to give them a taste of what to expect when they start at the school.

‘They had fun lessons,’ added Mary.

‘We try to make it a lot of fun for them. They don’t want to come to “school” two weeks early.

‘It’s good because they get to know us on a different level. It’s getting to know the staff, the people and the building.

‘It’s a big step. I remember when my kids did it.’