Football match held in memory of lost brother

MATCH The teams with Sukhwinder Singh-Digpal's father Amreek Singh-Digpal in the middle, Bristol manager Sukhdev Goojar-Singh on the left, and Amreek's brother Bukhunt with Sukhwinder's nephew Ajveer Singh-Digpal, two.  Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (113786-1)
MATCH The teams with Sukhwinder Singh-Digpal's father Amreek Singh-Digpal in the middle, Bristol manager Sukhdev Goojar-Singh on the left, and Amreek's brother Bukhunt with Sukhwinder's nephew Ajveer Singh-Digpal, two. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (113786-1)
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FRIENDS and family members joined forces to host a football match in memory of a much-loved Pompey fan.

Dalwinder Singh-Digpal, 30, of Salisbury Road, Southsea, organised the event after his brother Sukhwinder died from Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (Sads), at the age of just 26, as previously reported in The News.

TRIBUTE Sukhwinder Singh-Digpal

TRIBUTE Sukhwinder Singh-Digpal

The condition causes a person’s heart to stop beating suddenly.

And in a bid to raise awareness of the rare condition, Dalwinder and his extended family hosted a football match with the Portsmouth gurdwara and temple-goers in Bristol.

The Singh-Digpal family and some of their closest friends took on their opponents from a Sikh temple in Bristol yesterday, and beat them 7-3.

Dalwinder, who works as a bank manager, said: ‘It was a brilliant day and a fantastic feeling to win.

‘I was really pleased because I knew that my little brother was watching over us and that we’d made him happy up there.

‘It was all about remembering him and getting everyone together to celebrate his life as well as helping to raise awareness for the condition.’

The family are keen to begin raising money for the cause, but want to start by focusing their energy on helping people understand the dangers of the condition.

‘Having experienced it first-hand, and seen what my family went through, I want to do everything I can to make sure that other people don’t go through the same sort of thing,’ Dalwinder added.

‘It’s not something you can prepare for or try to avoid because it’s so sudden, but it is something that more people should know about.

‘That way it won’t be so much of a shock if it happens.’

After the match at the Mountbatten Centre, Alexandra Park, North End, the family held a gathering for around 150 people at Bransbury Park, Eastney, in memory of Sukhwinder.

Sads affects mainly people aged 17 to 22. Help and support is available from Cardiac Risk in the Young. See c-r-y.org.uk