Friends abseil down Spinnaker Tower for Charlie, six, who has leukaemia

Supporters and family friends of Charlie Harris who has leukaemia get ready to abseil at The Spinnaker Tower to raise money for his charity. (left to right), Claire Henry, Carly Cooper, Mark and Nikki Knoll-Pollard with front Ian Arbuckle.
Picture Ian Hargreaves (161205-3)
Supporters and family friends of Charlie Harris who has leukaemia get ready to abseil at The Spinnaker Tower to raise money for his charity. (left to right), Claire Henry, Carly Cooper, Mark and Nikki Knoll-Pollard with front Ian Arbuckle. Picture Ian Hargreaves (161205-3)

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  • Friends of Marie Harris took part in abseil to help her son Charlie
  • The six-year-old has leukaemia and set up a charity
  • The abseil raised nearly £600 for Kicking Cancer for Charlie
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A BRAVE six-year-old with leukaemia ensured his fundraising reached new heights with an abseil down the Spinnaker Tower.

Friends of Charlie Harris took on the Portsmouth landmark to raise cash for the charity set up by the youngster.

Charlie Harris (6) with his mum Marie Harris 

Picture: Sarah Standing (160652-5363)

Charlie Harris (6) with his mum Marie Harris Picture: Sarah Standing (160652-5363)

Charlie and his family started Kicking Cancer for Charlie after he was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2014.

The charity aims to help other poorly children. To boost donations, five close friends of Charlie’s mum Marie abseiled 100ft down the Spinnaker.

Marie, from Hilsea, said: ‘People were keen to help us with fundraising and the abseil was just something we thought of.

‘I wanted to do it but couldn’t because of a problem with my back.

We do fundraisers because we love him but for other people to help as well is amazing.

Marie Harris

‘It was quite humbling to know that people were willing to do that for Charlie.

‘We do fundraisers because we love him but for other people to help as well is amazing. The group raised nearly £600, which is really good. We were so pleased with that total which will go straight to the charity.’

The family’s neighbour, Ian Arbuckle, was one of the five people who went up high for the abseil – although he said being in the Royal Navy helped him deal with the fear factor.

‘I was a little nervous right before when I was at the top but generally I felt okay,’ said Ian.

‘I knew what to expect so I found the whole experience not too bad.

‘It was hard to say no to Charlie when I was asked if I could do the abseil because he’s such a lovely boy and it’s for a worthy cause.’

Carly Cooper met Marie and Charlie through a play group which her daughter attended. She stepped in two weeks before the abseil when Marie had to pull out.

‘I have done an abseil before so I was really excited to do it,’ she said.

‘I said to Marie that if anyone couldn’t do it then I would.

‘I couldn’t wait to get to the top. It was even better doing it knowing that it was for Charlie.’

As previously reported in The News, Charlie needs another two years of chemotherapy to help with his leukaemia.

Every night he takes the treatment orally and has a large dose of chemotherapy – and steroids – once a month.

To make a donation to Kicking Cancer for Charlie visit uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fund/KickingCancerforCharlie