Fundraisers dress up for Wear a Hat Day

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FULL of beans, with beaming grins and wearing funky hats, sponsored volunteers set off on a walk to raise money and awareness for charity.

The Give, Gain and Grow group took part in the event for Brain Tumour Research yesterday. The group walked from its base in Pavilion Way to the Royal Navy Submarine Museum, in Gosport, and raised hundreds of pounds for the cause.

Organiser Sue Greene, 54, said: ‘It’s lovely to be out together, promoting this incredible cause. Give, Gain and Grow helps raise awareness of important campaigns like this one and by doing so it unites the community.’

The national Wear A Hat Day event aims to boost research into one of the most common cancers.

Steve Webb, 48, one of the walkers, said: ‘It’s personal as well as national. A friend’s sister died of a brain tumour – it brought it home how important this research is.

‘Events like this help generate much-needed funds for the research. Not only that, but it provides an opportunity for the community to get together.’

Give, Gain and Grow, which is funded by the Department of Health’s Health and Social Care Volunteering Fund, grew out of the Loud and Proud steering group, whose members joined the walk.

The opportunity to meet and form friendships with different members of the community is a very important part of the group’s ethos.

Miles Fletcher, 27, a member of the Give, Gain and Grow group, has Asperger’s syndrome and said being a part of the group has empowered him. He said: ‘Sometimes it’s difficult for me to socialise but meeting new people helps a lot.’

The hats worn on yesterday’s walk varied but the wearers’ message was the same: help fund research into brain tumours.

LOOKING GOOD People taking part in Wear a Hat Day in Gosport

LOOKING GOOD People taking part in Wear a Hat Day in Gosport

Give, Gain and Grow organises volunteering opportunities for people lacking confidence due to mental health issues, learning or physical disabilities.

There were other events across the area, including a tea party for about 200 people at Southsea Caravan Park.

Events like this help generate much-needed funds for the research. Not only that, but it provides an opportunity for the community to get together

Steve Webb