Fundraising ball in memory of Gosport mum who died of brain tumour

FUNDRAISERS In the middle is Andy Foster whose wife Caroline died two years ago of a brain tumour with, left, their daughter Erin Foster, four. At the front is Norman Wisdom impersonator Glenn Ford.   Picture: Paul Jacobs (121055-1)
FUNDRAISERS In the middle is Andy Foster whose wife Caroline died two years ago of a brain tumour with, left, their daughter Erin Foster, four. At the front is Norman Wisdom impersonator Glenn Ford. Picture: Paul Jacobs (121055-1)

‘Don’t leave it too long to trim your hedges’

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THEY came out in droves to raise cash for vital brain tumour research in memory of a much-missed mum.

Family and friends of Caroline Foster, who died two years ago from a brain tumour, packed into the Thorngate Halls ballroom, Bury Road, Gosport, on Saturday night for a fundraising ball.

MISSED Caroline Foster with Erin

MISSED Caroline Foster with Erin

Caroline was just 38 years old when she died, only weeks after being diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumour.

She left behind husband Andy and their four-year-old daughter Erin, who both attended the evening.

Her loved ones were determined to keep her legacy shining bright by launching the Erin’s Angel appeal – a group affiliated to national charity Brain Tumour Research, which carries out work at the University of Portsmouth.

Some 200 tickets were sold for the evening, which featured a captivating performance from street dancer Chris Todd, a raffle, face painting, and Norman Wisdom tribute performer Glenn Ford.

A total of £1,865.37 was raised on the night. Proceeds from the event will go towards the cost of a day’s research into the disease, which costs around £2,750 a day.

The hall was decorated with pink and purple balloons and guests enjoyed a finger buffet and a disco.

The event was organised by her sister-in-law Karen Adams, of Tescombe Road in Gosport.

She said: ‘Caroline would be so chuffed with the evening, she would think it’s amazing.

‘Brain Tumour Research is the most underfunded charity there is and yet the disease is the biggest killer of children and people under 40. I have a list as long as your arm of people I’d like to thank, there are hundreds.’

Caroline’s husband Andy said: ‘I’m very proud – the response we have had so far has been excellent and there were a lot of people there. We are hoping to raise awareness of brain tumours and raise as much as we can for the charity.

‘We are possibly thinking of arranging more events like this and keeping the ball rolling.’

Hugh Adams, campaign manager for Brain Tumour Research, was one of the evening’s guests.

He said: ‘Everything we do is about raising funds and awareness because we are committed to funding research, as we are sure the only way to improve outcomes for patients is through research which has been woefully underfunded historically.

‘Events like this are fantastic because they encourage people to get involved. They are fun events, they raise money and awareness and have a sense of community.’

To find out more about the charity, visit erinsangel.co.uk.