Abseil and Highlands walk raises awareness of Marie Curie’s work

Kirsty Taylor and her friend Christian Dobson on their charity challenge in Scotland for Marie Curie Cancer
Kirsty Taylor and her friend Christian Dobson on their charity challenge in Scotland for Marie Curie Cancer

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Marie Curie, which has a branch in Southsea, will benefit from the fundraising efforts of a mother and daughter.

Kirsty Taylor and her six-year-old daughter Molly raised more than £1,100 for the charity after completing a gruelling 600-mile challenge in memory of Kirsty’s father Ronnie, who died 10 years ago from cancer aged 48.

Kirsty Taylor and her daughter Molly, six, on their charity challenge in Scotland for Marie Curie Cancer

Kirsty Taylor and her daughter Molly, six, on their charity challenge in Scotland for Marie Curie Cancer

Kirsty, of Owen Close, Gosport, was born and raised in Edinburgh, so she decided to return to Scotland to walk 96 miles across the West Highland Way to raise money for the charity.

The week-long challenge finished earlier this month after Kirsty abseiled down the Spinnaker Tower before the pair made the 500-mile drive north.

She said: ‘We’re delighted to have not only raised so much money, but also raised awareness and given people a better understanding of what Marie Curie does.

‘It can make a massive difference to a lot of people’s lives, and that’s what it’s all about.’

The team initially set out to also complete the Three Peaks Challenge by climbing Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Mount Snowdon but bad weather restricted their efforts but this did not dampen Kirsty’s spirits.

‘It just means we’ll have to go back in the next few months and complete that part of the challenge,’ she said.

‘I’m always living for the next challenge anyway, most of what I do at work or socially is to help other people out.’

Molly, who attends Grange Infant School in Gosport, said: ‘The West Highland Way was hard but it was worth it because the money we made will make the ends of people’s lives more comfortable. Getting to see the beautiful countryside made the struggle worth it.’

Kirsty’s mum Ann Niven, 61, made up the team as back-up driver and was a crucial in keeping spirits up throughout the journey.

‘It’s the combined spirits of a team that make an event successful but we are more than just that, we’re a family and those roots go deeper and will last forever,’ she said.

To donate go to justgiving.com/Kirsty-Taylor1984.