Alex is on road to recovery four years after stroke

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  • Alex Roantree-Roesch had a devastating stroke aged seven
  • He had to learn to walk and talk again
  • Four years on, he has made brilliant progress and has been honoured by a charity
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A BOY who had to learn to walk and talk again at just seven years of age after a debilitating stroke has made a miraculous recovery.

Alex Roantree-Roesch also lost the use of his right side following the stroke three days before Christmas in 2011.

Alex Roantree-Roesch, 11, from Gosport, with his sister Gwen, three Picture: Sarah Standing (151973-4930)

Alex Roantree-Roesch, 11, from Gosport, with his sister Gwen, three Picture: Sarah Standing (151973-4930)

But he has made such good progress that the Stroke Association has honoured him with an award.

Mum Angela, of Coronado Road, Gosport, said: ‘The day of Alex’s stroke was a normal day like any other.

‘It was three days before Christmas Day and we were all looking forward to spending time together with the family.

‘Alex was at home with his dad when he suddenly collapsed. From that moment, our lives changed forever.

I was really excited about winning the award because it was the same day as my birthday

Alex Roantree-Roesch

‘Alex went back to being a newborn baby.

‘He couldn’t lift his head off the pillow, he couldn’t speak, he couldn’t eat.

‘Basically Alex has had to learn to do everything again.’

Doctors believe the stroke was caused by chicken pox virus – which Alex had nine months earlier.

Alex Roantree-Roesch receives his award from the Stroke Association

Alex Roantree-Roesch receives his award from the Stroke Association

At the time of his stroke Angela was four months pregnant and gave birth to daughter Gwen the following May, while Alex was still recovering in hospital.

Describing him before the stroke, Angela said: ‘Alex was just like any other typical seven-year-old boy.

‘He was very active and energetic, going swimming and attending weekly tennis lessons, and always had a cheeky smile on his face.’

Alex has made enormous progress and now takes karate and swimming lessons.

He has just earned his one-length swimming badge.

And he was highly commended in the Life After Stroke Award from the Stroke Association in recognition of his courage and determination.

Angela said: ‘Everyone in the room said how proud we should be of him.

‘I cried and so did a few other people. We really are so proud of Alex. He has done so well.’

Alex said: ‘I was really excited about winning the award because it was the same day as my birthday.’

Esme Mutter, regional head of operations at the Stroke Association in south central region.

She said: ‘As Alex and his family know all too well, the condition can strike at any age.’