Diabetes cases are on the rise across region

Obesity has been blamed for the rising tide of diabetes diagnoses
Obesity has been blamed for the rising tide of diabetes diagnoses

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  • Number of diabetes cases is up across the area
  • Chairman of clinical commissioning group says they are fighting back
  • Prime minister hints at a ‘sugar tax’
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DIABETES cases are soaring across the Portsmouth area, a new survey shows.

But a GP-led group says it is making a ‘real impact’ with its efforts to beat the disease.

Diabetes UK said the number of adult diabetes sufferers in Portsmouth has gone from 9,255 in 2012/2013 to 9,901 people in 2014/2015, a jump of 5.57 per cent.

The figure is even higher in Fareham and Gosport, which has seen a rise of 6.45 per cent – from 9,347 in 2012/2013 to 10,557 in 2014/2015.

And the South Eastern Hampshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) area, which covers Havant, Hayling Island and Waterlooville, has seen a 6.5 per cent increase, up from 10,271 in 2012/2013 to 11,147 in 2014/2015.

Dr David Chilvers, who chairs the Fareham and Gosport CCG, said the group was doing its best to fight back against the disease and was making a ‘real impact’.

Dr Chilvers said: ‘We have been encouraging all our GPs to look for patients proactively.

‘That way we can help them with education and information that will reduce the burden of the disease.

‘People don’t die from diabetes – they die from the complications that it can cause, and treatment can reduce the risks immensely.

‘But only if we know about it.’

If left untreated diabetes is associated with serious vascular complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations leading to disability and premature death. But good management of the condition can reduce the risk of complications.

The figures come as prime minister David Cameron hinted at the possibility of introducing a ‘sugar tax’, which medical experts say is needed to prevent further rises in obesity, diabetes and cancer.

Mr Cameron, who has previously opposed a new tax, said at a press conference: ‘I don’t really want to put new taxes on anything but we do have to recognise that we face potentially in Britain something of an obesity crisis. We do need to have a fully worked-up programme and we will be making announcements later in the year.’