Dining in the dark is an eye-opener!

Dance night raises cash for Titchfield cancer centre

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IMAGINE eating a bowl of soup or buttering a bread roll – in the dark.

Dozens of diners last night experienced it for themselves as they wore blindfolds and tucked into a three-course meal.

143345_DINNER_26/11/14''(l-r) David Gaines, Simon Williams, Marilyn Williams and Hilary Gaines. ''Dine in the dark at Lauro's Brasserie, Fareham. Charity event hosted by  Open Sight to raise awareness of the everyday challenges faced by blind and partially sighted people. '.'Picture: Allan Hutchings (143345-531) PPP-141126-210812001

143345_DINNER_26/11/14''(l-r) David Gaines, Simon Williams, Marilyn Williams and Hilary Gaines. ''Dine in the dark at Lauro's Brasserie, Fareham. Charity event hosted by Open Sight to raise awareness of the everyday challenges faced by blind and partially sighted people. '.'Picture: Allan Hutchings (143345-531) PPP-141126-210812001

Some were not taking any chances and turned up for the meal wearing aprons.

Dining In The Dark, which took place at Lauro’s Brasserie, in High Street, Fareham, was organised by Hampshire-based charity Open Sight.

The charity has provided support to blind and partially sighted people across the county for more than 90 years.

The Mayor of Fareham, Councillor David Norris, was among the diners getting to grips with eating blindfolded.

He said: ‘It’s what blind people do all the time.

‘It was difficult. It’s a good idea to see sighted people experiencing what blind people go through daily.’

Mayoress Pamela Norris said: ‘You have to feel everything.

‘You put your fork to your mouth and there’s nothing on it! It’s a new experience for us, but we are enjoying it.’

Dee Batu, 70, from Titchfield, ate her salmon starter with her hands.

‘It harnesses the senses because I am not using a knife and fork,’ she said.

Caroline Canessa, 50, from Baffins, said: ‘Food definitely tastes better. You are using all the senses.’

Frances Glasgow, from Gosport, was celebrating her 84th birthday.

‘I’m enjoying it and it’s really fun,’ he said.

The night raised around £500 for the charity.

Tessa Barrett, chief executive of Open Sight, said: ‘We have organised a dinner in the dark to raise the profile of people who are sight-impaired themselves and the difficulties they face in restaurants.

‘We are trying to raise awareness of coloured plates, good contrast, and good lighting.’